Human herpesvirus 6 and cytomegalovirus infections in children with human immunodeficiency virus infection and cancer

Charles T. Leach, Bradley H Pollock, Kenneth L. Mcclain, Richard T. Parmley, Sharon B. Murphy, Hal B. Jenson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim. Measure the prevalence of human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) and cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections in children and adolescents with HIV infection and malignancy. Methods. Semiquantitative polymerase chain reaction and serology were used to test for HHV-6 and CMV infections in 31 cases (HIV-infected children with cancer), 56 HIV controls (HIV-infected children without cancer) and 30 cancer controls (HIV-uninfected children with cancer). Results. In cases, HIV controls and cancer controls, HHV-6 DNA was detected in 29, 39 and 34%, respectively, and CMV DNA was detected in 13, 4 and 7%, respectively. Four cases (13%) and no HIV controls or cancer controls harbored HHV-6 subtype A (P = 0.014). In cases, HIV controls and cancer controls, the prevalence of HHV-6 antibodies was 58, 68 and 93%, respectively, and the prevalence of CMV antibodies was 71, 48 and 70%, respectively. HHV-6 seroprevalence was lower in cases than in cancer controls (P = 0.002), even with adjustments for age and CD4 concentrations; however, HHV-6 infection rates (presence of HHV-6 DNA and/or HHV-6 antibodies) were similar in all groups. Stratification showed that CMV infection was more common in younger patients (ages < 8 years) without severe immune suppression (CD4 concentration >200 cells/μl) than in HIV controls (odds ration, 10.343; 95% confidence interval, 1.65, 121.57). Geometric mean titers of serum anti-CMV antibodies, but not anti-HHV-6 antibodies, were higher in cases (1:71) than in HIV controls (1:33) (P = 0.005). Conclusions. HHV-6 and CMV infections were common among children with HIV infection and cancer. CMV seropositivity also was associated with cancer in younger HIV-infected patients who did not have severe immune suppression. HHV-6A was detected only in HIV-infected children with cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)125-132
Number of pages8
JournalPediatric Infectious Disease Journal
Volume21
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Human Herpesvirus 6
Herpesviridae Infections
Cytomegalovirus Infections
Virus Diseases
HIV
Neoplasms
Cytomegalovirus
Antibodies
HIV Infections
DNA
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Serology
HIV-1
Anti-Idiotypic Antibodies

Keywords

  • Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome
  • Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-associated lymphomas
  • Adolescent
  • Child
  • Cytomegalovirus
  • Human herpesvirus 6
  • Human immunodeficiency virus
  • Neoplasms
  • Non-Hodgkin lymphoma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

Human herpesvirus 6 and cytomegalovirus infections in children with human immunodeficiency virus infection and cancer. / Leach, Charles T.; Pollock, Bradley H; Mcclain, Kenneth L.; Parmley, Richard T.; Murphy, Sharon B.; Jenson, Hal B.

In: Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, Vol. 21, No. 2, 2002, p. 125-132.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Leach, Charles T. ; Pollock, Bradley H ; Mcclain, Kenneth L. ; Parmley, Richard T. ; Murphy, Sharon B. ; Jenson, Hal B. / Human herpesvirus 6 and cytomegalovirus infections in children with human immunodeficiency virus infection and cancer. In: Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal. 2002 ; Vol. 21, No. 2. pp. 125-132.
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abstract = "Aim. Measure the prevalence of human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) and cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections in children and adolescents with HIV infection and malignancy. Methods. Semiquantitative polymerase chain reaction and serology were used to test for HHV-6 and CMV infections in 31 cases (HIV-infected children with cancer), 56 HIV controls (HIV-infected children without cancer) and 30 cancer controls (HIV-uninfected children with cancer). Results. In cases, HIV controls and cancer controls, HHV-6 DNA was detected in 29, 39 and 34{\%}, respectively, and CMV DNA was detected in 13, 4 and 7{\%}, respectively. Four cases (13{\%}) and no HIV controls or cancer controls harbored HHV-6 subtype A (P = 0.014). In cases, HIV controls and cancer controls, the prevalence of HHV-6 antibodies was 58, 68 and 93{\%}, respectively, and the prevalence of CMV antibodies was 71, 48 and 70{\%}, respectively. HHV-6 seroprevalence was lower in cases than in cancer controls (P = 0.002), even with adjustments for age and CD4 concentrations; however, HHV-6 infection rates (presence of HHV-6 DNA and/or HHV-6 antibodies) were similar in all groups. Stratification showed that CMV infection was more common in younger patients (ages < 8 years) without severe immune suppression (CD4 concentration >200 cells/μl) than in HIV controls (odds ration, 10.343; 95{\%} confidence interval, 1.65, 121.57). Geometric mean titers of serum anti-CMV antibodies, but not anti-HHV-6 antibodies, were higher in cases (1:71) than in HIV controls (1:33) (P = 0.005). Conclusions. HHV-6 and CMV infections were common among children with HIV infection and cancer. CMV seropositivity also was associated with cancer in younger HIV-infected patients who did not have severe immune suppression. HHV-6A was detected only in HIV-infected children with cancer.",
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T1 - Human herpesvirus 6 and cytomegalovirus infections in children with human immunodeficiency virus infection and cancer

AU - Leach, Charles T.

AU - Pollock, Bradley H

AU - Mcclain, Kenneth L.

AU - Parmley, Richard T.

AU - Murphy, Sharon B.

AU - Jenson, Hal B.

PY - 2002

Y1 - 2002

N2 - Aim. Measure the prevalence of human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) and cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections in children and adolescents with HIV infection and malignancy. Methods. Semiquantitative polymerase chain reaction and serology were used to test for HHV-6 and CMV infections in 31 cases (HIV-infected children with cancer), 56 HIV controls (HIV-infected children without cancer) and 30 cancer controls (HIV-uninfected children with cancer). Results. In cases, HIV controls and cancer controls, HHV-6 DNA was detected in 29, 39 and 34%, respectively, and CMV DNA was detected in 13, 4 and 7%, respectively. Four cases (13%) and no HIV controls or cancer controls harbored HHV-6 subtype A (P = 0.014). In cases, HIV controls and cancer controls, the prevalence of HHV-6 antibodies was 58, 68 and 93%, respectively, and the prevalence of CMV antibodies was 71, 48 and 70%, respectively. HHV-6 seroprevalence was lower in cases than in cancer controls (P = 0.002), even with adjustments for age and CD4 concentrations; however, HHV-6 infection rates (presence of HHV-6 DNA and/or HHV-6 antibodies) were similar in all groups. Stratification showed that CMV infection was more common in younger patients (ages < 8 years) without severe immune suppression (CD4 concentration >200 cells/μl) than in HIV controls (odds ration, 10.343; 95% confidence interval, 1.65, 121.57). Geometric mean titers of serum anti-CMV antibodies, but not anti-HHV-6 antibodies, were higher in cases (1:71) than in HIV controls (1:33) (P = 0.005). Conclusions. HHV-6 and CMV infections were common among children with HIV infection and cancer. CMV seropositivity also was associated with cancer in younger HIV-infected patients who did not have severe immune suppression. HHV-6A was detected only in HIV-infected children with cancer.

AB - Aim. Measure the prevalence of human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) and cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections in children and adolescents with HIV infection and malignancy. Methods. Semiquantitative polymerase chain reaction and serology were used to test for HHV-6 and CMV infections in 31 cases (HIV-infected children with cancer), 56 HIV controls (HIV-infected children without cancer) and 30 cancer controls (HIV-uninfected children with cancer). Results. In cases, HIV controls and cancer controls, HHV-6 DNA was detected in 29, 39 and 34%, respectively, and CMV DNA was detected in 13, 4 and 7%, respectively. Four cases (13%) and no HIV controls or cancer controls harbored HHV-6 subtype A (P = 0.014). In cases, HIV controls and cancer controls, the prevalence of HHV-6 antibodies was 58, 68 and 93%, respectively, and the prevalence of CMV antibodies was 71, 48 and 70%, respectively. HHV-6 seroprevalence was lower in cases than in cancer controls (P = 0.002), even with adjustments for age and CD4 concentrations; however, HHV-6 infection rates (presence of HHV-6 DNA and/or HHV-6 antibodies) were similar in all groups. Stratification showed that CMV infection was more common in younger patients (ages < 8 years) without severe immune suppression (CD4 concentration >200 cells/μl) than in HIV controls (odds ration, 10.343; 95% confidence interval, 1.65, 121.57). Geometric mean titers of serum anti-CMV antibodies, but not anti-HHV-6 antibodies, were higher in cases (1:71) than in HIV controls (1:33) (P = 0.005). Conclusions. HHV-6 and CMV infections were common among children with HIV infection and cancer. CMV seropositivity also was associated with cancer in younger HIV-infected patients who did not have severe immune suppression. HHV-6A was detected only in HIV-infected children with cancer.

KW - Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

KW - Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-associated lymphomas

KW - Adolescent

KW - Child

KW - Cytomegalovirus

KW - Human herpesvirus 6

KW - Human immunodeficiency virus

KW - Neoplasms

KW - Non-Hodgkin lymphoma

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