How is the lower urinary tract affected by gynaecological surgery?

Kilian Walsh, Anthony R Stone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Many subjective reports have suggested that gynaecological surgery can produce LUTS. Soon after simple hysterectomy changes in voiding are common, but there is no firm evidence that long-term bladder dysfunction is the rule. Radical hysterectomy is more likely to cause prolonged symptoms. The changes after ovarian surgery are related to a change in the hormonal status and its effect on bladder function rather than a neural or vascular phenomenon. Prolapse and incontinence surgery by their very nature will cause a change in voiding function which is well recognized but unpredictable in its pattern. Patients should be warned of a possible change in voiding function at the time of consent, but a change in LUTS should not be deemed as a surgical failure after gynaecological surgery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)272-275
Number of pages4
JournalBJU International
Volume94
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2004

Fingerprint

Gynecologic Surgical Procedures
Hysterectomy
Urinary Tract
Urinary Bladder
Prolapse
Blood Vessels

Keywords

  • Gynaecological surgery
  • Hysterectomy
  • Incontinence
  • Lower urinary tract

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

How is the lower urinary tract affected by gynaecological surgery? / Walsh, Kilian; Stone, Anthony R.

In: BJU International, Vol. 94, No. 3, 08.2004, p. 272-275.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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