How does the presence of high need for recovery affect the association between perceived high chronic exposure to stressful work demands and work productivity loss?

Carolyn S Dewa, Karen Nieuwenhuijsen, Judith K. Sluiter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Employers have increasingly been interested in decreasing work stress. However, little attention has been given to recovery from the exertion experienced during work. This paper addresses the question: how does the presence of high need for recovery (HNFR) affect the association between perceived high chronic exposure to stressful work demands (PHCE) and work productivity loss (WPL)?. Methods: Data were from a population-based survey of 2219 Ontario workers. The Work Limitations Questionnaire was used to measure WPL. The relationship between HNFR and WPL was examined using four multiple regression models. Results: Our results indicate that HNFR affects the association between PHCE and WPL. They also suggest that PHCE alone significantly increases the risk of WPL. Conclusion: Our results suggest that HNFR as well as PHCE could be an important factor for workplaces to target to increase worker productivity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)617-622
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Volume58
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2016

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Ontario
Workplace
Population
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

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