How do metacarpophalangeal joint extension, collateromotion and axial rotation influence dorsal surface strains of the equine proximal phalanx at different loads in vitro?

Ellen Singer, Tanya Garcia, Susan M Stover

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The biomechanical circumstances that promote sagittal fracture of the equine proximal phalanx (P1) are poorly understood. In order to improve our understanding of equine metacarpophalangeal joint (MCPJ) biomechanics and potential aetiologies of sagittal P1 fractures, the study objectives were to quantify P1 bone strains, collateromotion and axial rotation during MCPJ extension under controlled loading circumstances. Unilateral limbs from six cadavers were instrumented with bone reference markers for measurement of P1 movement relative to third metacarpal bone positions during axial limb loading to 10,500. N. Bone reference markers recorded by video were digitized and the movement analyzed during MCPJ extension. Concurrently, dorsoproximal P1 surface strains were measured with one uniaxial and one rosette strain gauge. Strain gauge data was reduced to determine principal and shear strain magnitude and direction. External axial rotation and collateromotion increased with increasing MCPJ extension. Maximum principal strain increased linearly as load increased from 2000 to 10,500. N. Minimum principal and maximum shear strains had curvilinear relationships with limb loading, with negligible strain magnitude until approximately 6000. N load, after which strain increased rapidly. The direction of P1 minimum principal strain shifted approximately 30-40° as load increased from 5400. N to 10,000. N, moving from proximolateral-distomedial to a nearly proximodistal direction. At near maximal MCPJ extension, with concurrent axial rotation and collateromotion, a rapid increase in dorsoproximal P1 bone strain and a change in principal strain direction occurred. The alterations in principal strain magnitude and direction associated with maximal MCPJ extension may support a biomechanical theory for sagittal P1 fracture occurrence in horses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)738-744
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Biomechanics
Volume46
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 22 2013

Fingerprint

Metacarpophalangeal Joint
Horses
Loads (forces)
Bone
Bone and Bones
Extremities
Shear strain
Strain gages
Metacarpal Bones
Joints (anatomy)
Weight-Bearing
Cadaver
Biomechanical Phenomena
In Vitro Techniques
Direction compound

Keywords

  • Axial rotation
  • Collateromotion
  • First phalanx
  • Horse
  • Principal strain
  • Shear strain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Rehabilitation
  • Biophysics
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

@article{16771a048adb40d1b9ecd2212a2b79a4,
title = "How do metacarpophalangeal joint extension, collateromotion and axial rotation influence dorsal surface strains of the equine proximal phalanx at different loads in vitro?",
abstract = "The biomechanical circumstances that promote sagittal fracture of the equine proximal phalanx (P1) are poorly understood. In order to improve our understanding of equine metacarpophalangeal joint (MCPJ) biomechanics and potential aetiologies of sagittal P1 fractures, the study objectives were to quantify P1 bone strains, collateromotion and axial rotation during MCPJ extension under controlled loading circumstances. Unilateral limbs from six cadavers were instrumented with bone reference markers for measurement of P1 movement relative to third metacarpal bone positions during axial limb loading to 10,500. N. Bone reference markers recorded by video were digitized and the movement analyzed during MCPJ extension. Concurrently, dorsoproximal P1 surface strains were measured with one uniaxial and one rosette strain gauge. Strain gauge data was reduced to determine principal and shear strain magnitude and direction. External axial rotation and collateromotion increased with increasing MCPJ extension. Maximum principal strain increased linearly as load increased from 2000 to 10,500. N. Minimum principal and maximum shear strains had curvilinear relationships with limb loading, with negligible strain magnitude until approximately 6000. N load, after which strain increased rapidly. The direction of P1 minimum principal strain shifted approximately 30-40° as load increased from 5400. N to 10,000. N, moving from proximolateral-distomedial to a nearly proximodistal direction. At near maximal MCPJ extension, with concurrent axial rotation and collateromotion, a rapid increase in dorsoproximal P1 bone strain and a change in principal strain direction occurred. The alterations in principal strain magnitude and direction associated with maximal MCPJ extension may support a biomechanical theory for sagittal P1 fracture occurrence in horses.",
keywords = "Axial rotation, Collateromotion, First phalanx, Horse, Principal strain, Shear strain",
author = "Ellen Singer and Tanya Garcia and Stover, {Susan M}",
year = "2013",
month = "2",
day = "22",
doi = "10.1016/j.jbiomech.2012.11.028",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "46",
pages = "738--744",
journal = "Journal of Biomechanics",
issn = "0021-9290",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - How do metacarpophalangeal joint extension, collateromotion and axial rotation influence dorsal surface strains of the equine proximal phalanx at different loads in vitro?

AU - Singer, Ellen

AU - Garcia, Tanya

AU - Stover, Susan M

PY - 2013/2/22

Y1 - 2013/2/22

N2 - The biomechanical circumstances that promote sagittal fracture of the equine proximal phalanx (P1) are poorly understood. In order to improve our understanding of equine metacarpophalangeal joint (MCPJ) biomechanics and potential aetiologies of sagittal P1 fractures, the study objectives were to quantify P1 bone strains, collateromotion and axial rotation during MCPJ extension under controlled loading circumstances. Unilateral limbs from six cadavers were instrumented with bone reference markers for measurement of P1 movement relative to third metacarpal bone positions during axial limb loading to 10,500. N. Bone reference markers recorded by video were digitized and the movement analyzed during MCPJ extension. Concurrently, dorsoproximal P1 surface strains were measured with one uniaxial and one rosette strain gauge. Strain gauge data was reduced to determine principal and shear strain magnitude and direction. External axial rotation and collateromotion increased with increasing MCPJ extension. Maximum principal strain increased linearly as load increased from 2000 to 10,500. N. Minimum principal and maximum shear strains had curvilinear relationships with limb loading, with negligible strain magnitude until approximately 6000. N load, after which strain increased rapidly. The direction of P1 minimum principal strain shifted approximately 30-40° as load increased from 5400. N to 10,000. N, moving from proximolateral-distomedial to a nearly proximodistal direction. At near maximal MCPJ extension, with concurrent axial rotation and collateromotion, a rapid increase in dorsoproximal P1 bone strain and a change in principal strain direction occurred. The alterations in principal strain magnitude and direction associated with maximal MCPJ extension may support a biomechanical theory for sagittal P1 fracture occurrence in horses.

AB - The biomechanical circumstances that promote sagittal fracture of the equine proximal phalanx (P1) are poorly understood. In order to improve our understanding of equine metacarpophalangeal joint (MCPJ) biomechanics and potential aetiologies of sagittal P1 fractures, the study objectives were to quantify P1 bone strains, collateromotion and axial rotation during MCPJ extension under controlled loading circumstances. Unilateral limbs from six cadavers were instrumented with bone reference markers for measurement of P1 movement relative to third metacarpal bone positions during axial limb loading to 10,500. N. Bone reference markers recorded by video were digitized and the movement analyzed during MCPJ extension. Concurrently, dorsoproximal P1 surface strains were measured with one uniaxial and one rosette strain gauge. Strain gauge data was reduced to determine principal and shear strain magnitude and direction. External axial rotation and collateromotion increased with increasing MCPJ extension. Maximum principal strain increased linearly as load increased from 2000 to 10,500. N. Minimum principal and maximum shear strains had curvilinear relationships with limb loading, with negligible strain magnitude until approximately 6000. N load, after which strain increased rapidly. The direction of P1 minimum principal strain shifted approximately 30-40° as load increased from 5400. N to 10,000. N, moving from proximolateral-distomedial to a nearly proximodistal direction. At near maximal MCPJ extension, with concurrent axial rotation and collateromotion, a rapid increase in dorsoproximal P1 bone strain and a change in principal strain direction occurred. The alterations in principal strain magnitude and direction associated with maximal MCPJ extension may support a biomechanical theory for sagittal P1 fracture occurrence in horses.

KW - Axial rotation

KW - Collateromotion

KW - First phalanx

KW - Horse

KW - Principal strain

KW - Shear strain

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84879883865&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84879883865&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jbiomech.2012.11.028

DO - 10.1016/j.jbiomech.2012.11.028

M3 - Article

C2 - 23246042

AN - SCOPUS:84879883865

VL - 46

SP - 738

EP - 744

JO - Journal of Biomechanics

JF - Journal of Biomechanics

SN - 0021-9290

IS - 4

ER -