Hostile Takeover: Hijacking of Endoplasmic Reticulum Function by T4SS and T3SS Effectors Creates a Niche for Intracellular Pathogens

April Y. Tsai, Bevin C. English, Renee M Tsolis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

After entering a cell, intracellular pathogens must evade destruction and generate a niche for intracellular replication. A strategy shared by multiple intracellular pathogens is the deployment of type III secretion system (T3SS)- and type IV secretion system (T4SS)-injected proteins (effectors) that subvert cellular functions. A subset of these effectors targets activities of the host cell's endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Effectors are now appreciated to interfere with the ER in multiple ways, including capture of secretory vesicles, tethering of pathogen vacuoles to the ER, and manipulation of ER-based autophagy initiation and the unfolded-protein response. These strategies enable pathogens to generate a niche with access to cellular nutrients and to evade the host cell's defenses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalMicrobiology spectrum
Volume7
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2019

Fingerprint

Endoplasmic Reticulum
niche
pathogen
secretion
Unfolded Protein Response
protein
Autophagy
Secretory Vesicles
vesicle
Vacuoles
Food
nutrient
Proteins
Type III Secretion Systems

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Ecology
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Genetics
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Cell Biology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Hostile Takeover : Hijacking of Endoplasmic Reticulum Function by T4SS and T3SS Effectors Creates a Niche for Intracellular Pathogens. / Tsai, April Y.; English, Bevin C.; Tsolis, Renee M.

In: Microbiology spectrum, Vol. 7, No. 3, 01.05.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{c35b5cf35751474ba437ab69fb1f9003,
title = "Hostile Takeover: Hijacking of Endoplasmic Reticulum Function by T4SS and T3SS Effectors Creates a Niche for Intracellular Pathogens",
abstract = "After entering a cell, intracellular pathogens must evade destruction and generate a niche for intracellular replication. A strategy shared by multiple intracellular pathogens is the deployment of type III secretion system (T3SS)- and type IV secretion system (T4SS)-injected proteins (effectors) that subvert cellular functions. A subset of these effectors targets activities of the host cell's endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Effectors are now appreciated to interfere with the ER in multiple ways, including capture of secretory vesicles, tethering of pathogen vacuoles to the ER, and manipulation of ER-based autophagy initiation and the unfolded-protein response. These strategies enable pathogens to generate a niche with access to cellular nutrients and to evade the host cell's defenses.",
author = "Tsai, {April Y.} and English, {Bevin C.} and Tsolis, {Renee M}",
year = "2019",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1128/microbiolspec.PSIB-0027-2019",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "7",
journal = "Microbiology spectrum",
issn = "2165-0497",
publisher = "American Society for Microbiology",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Hostile Takeover

T2 - Hijacking of Endoplasmic Reticulum Function by T4SS and T3SS Effectors Creates a Niche for Intracellular Pathogens

AU - Tsai, April Y.

AU - English, Bevin C.

AU - Tsolis, Renee M

PY - 2019/5/1

Y1 - 2019/5/1

N2 - After entering a cell, intracellular pathogens must evade destruction and generate a niche for intracellular replication. A strategy shared by multiple intracellular pathogens is the deployment of type III secretion system (T3SS)- and type IV secretion system (T4SS)-injected proteins (effectors) that subvert cellular functions. A subset of these effectors targets activities of the host cell's endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Effectors are now appreciated to interfere with the ER in multiple ways, including capture of secretory vesicles, tethering of pathogen vacuoles to the ER, and manipulation of ER-based autophagy initiation and the unfolded-protein response. These strategies enable pathogens to generate a niche with access to cellular nutrients and to evade the host cell's defenses.

AB - After entering a cell, intracellular pathogens must evade destruction and generate a niche for intracellular replication. A strategy shared by multiple intracellular pathogens is the deployment of type III secretion system (T3SS)- and type IV secretion system (T4SS)-injected proteins (effectors) that subvert cellular functions. A subset of these effectors targets activities of the host cell's endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Effectors are now appreciated to interfere with the ER in multiple ways, including capture of secretory vesicles, tethering of pathogen vacuoles to the ER, and manipulation of ER-based autophagy initiation and the unfolded-protein response. These strategies enable pathogens to generate a niche with access to cellular nutrients and to evade the host cell's defenses.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85068118293&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85068118293&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1128/microbiolspec.PSIB-0027-2019

DO - 10.1128/microbiolspec.PSIB-0027-2019

M3 - Article

C2 - 31198132

AN - SCOPUS:85068118293

VL - 7

JO - Microbiology spectrum

JF - Microbiology spectrum

SN - 2165-0497

IS - 3

ER -