Host factors affecting seroprevalence of bluetongue virus infections of cattle.

M. P. Ward, Tim Carpenter, Bennie Osburn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

Results of testing of 19,731 samples from a serologic survey of cattle with bluetongue virus (BTV) infections in Australia were analyzed for association between age, species, or sex and test result. Bivariate analysis indicated that all 3 host factors were associated with test result. After adjusting for confounding caused by the location of each animal in the study (high, moderate, and low BTV prevalence regions), cattle > or = 4 years old had an odds ratio of 4.33 (95% confidence interval, 3.99, 4.71) for a positive test result, compared with that for cattle < 2 years old. Cattle 2 to 4 years had an odds ratio of 2.28 (2.14, 2.54), compared with cattle < 2 years old. Bos taurus cattle had an odds ratio of 1.76 (1.63, 2.05) of a positive test result, compared with crossbred cattle, and B indicus cattle had an odds ratio of 1.20 (1.09, 1.33), compared with crossbred cattle. Sexually intact (+) male cattle were found to have an odds ratio of 3.13 (2.66, 3.49) for a positive test result, compared with castrated male (-) cattle, and female cattle were found to have an odds ratio of 1.38 (1.29, 1.48), compared with male (-) cattle. Multivariate analysis of BTV testing results was performed, using stepwise logistic regression. The most parsimonious model selected included age, species, and sex factors, and first-order interaction terms between these factors. This model was only able to be fit to data from cattle restricted to the high (> 25%) BTV prevalence region. Odds ratio were found to increase with age for male (-) cattle of all species.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)916-920
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Veterinary Research
Volume55
Issue number7
StatePublished - Jul 1 1994

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

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