Host cell-induced signaling causes Clostridium perfringens to upregulate production of toxins important for intestinal infections

Jianming Chen, Menglin Ma, Francisco A Uzal, Bruce A. McClane

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

Clostridium perfringens causes enteritis and enterotoxemia in humans and livestock due to prolific toxin production. In broth culture, C. perfringens uses the Agr-like quorum sensing (QS) system to regulate production of toxins important for enteritis/enterotoxemia, including beta toxin (CPB), enterotoxin, and epsilon toxin (ETX). The VirS/VirR two-component regulatory system (TCRS) also controls CPB production in broth cultures. Both the Agr-like QS and VirS/VirR systems are important when C. perfringens senses enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells and responds by upregulating CPB production; however, only the Agr-like QS system is needed for host cell-induced ETX production. These in vitro observations have pathophysiologic relevance since both the VirS/VirR and Agr-like QS signaling systems are required for C. perfringens strain CN3685 to produce CPB in vivo and to cause enteritis or enterotoxemia. Thus, apparently upon sensing its presence in the intestines, C. perfringens utilizes QS and TCRS signaling to produce toxins necessary for intestinal virulence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalGut Microbes
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

Keywords

  • Agr
  • Beta toxin
  • Clostridium perfringens
  • Enterotoxin
  • Epsilon toxin
  • Intestinal infection
  • Quorum sensing
  • Two component regulatory system
  • VirS/VirR

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Microbiology

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