Horseshoe characteristics as possible risk factors for fatal musculoskeletal injury of Thoroughbred racehorses

Albert J. Kane, Susan M Stover, Ian Gardner, James Case, Bill J. Johnson, Deryck H. Read, Alex Ardans

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

80 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective - To evaluate selected shoe characteristics as risk factors for fatal musculoskeletal injury (FMI) and specifically for suspensory apparatus failure (SAF) and cannon bone condylar fracture (CDY) of Thoroughbred racehorses in California. Design - Case-control study. Animals - Thoroughbred racehorses (n = 201) that died or were euthanatized at California racetracks between August 1992 and July 1994. Procedure - Shoe characteristics were compared between case horses affected by FMI (155), SAF (79), and CDY (41) and control horses that died for reasons unrelated to the appendicular musculoskeletal system (non-FMI; 46). Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios for FMI, SAF, and CDY. Results - Toe grabs were identified as possible risk factors for FMI, SAF, and CDY. The odds of FMI, SAF, and CDY were 1.8, 6.5, and 7.0, respectively, times greater for horses shod with low toe grabs than for horses shod without toe grabs on front shoes. Horses shod with regular toe grabs on front shoes had odds 3.5, 15.6, and 17.1 times greater (P < 0.05) for FMI, SAF, and CDY, respectively, compared with horses shod without toe grabs. The odds of horses shod with rim shoes were a third (P < 0.05) of those shod without rim shoes for either FMI or SAF. The apparent association between toe grab type and CDY may, in part, be attributable to concurrent SAF and CDY injuries in many horses. Clinical Relevance - Avoiding the use of toe grabs should decrease the incidence of FMI, especially SAF, in Thoroughbred racehorses. The use of rim shoes that are more consistent with natural hoof shape may decrease injury risk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1147-1152
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Veterinary Research
Volume57
Issue number8
StatePublished - Aug 1996

Fingerprint

racehorses
risk factors
Shoes
Toes
Horses
horses
Wounds and Injuries
musculoskeletal system
bone fractures
hooves
case-control studies
odds ratio
Hoof and Claw
Musculoskeletal System
Bone Fractures
incidence
Case-Control Studies
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Horseshoe characteristics as possible risk factors for fatal musculoskeletal injury of Thoroughbred racehorses. / Kane, Albert J.; Stover, Susan M; Gardner, Ian; Case, James; Johnson, Bill J.; Read, Deryck H.; Ardans, Alex.

In: American Journal of Veterinary Research, Vol. 57, No. 8, 08.1996, p. 1147-1152.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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