Home-based video visits for pediatric patients with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes

Stephanie Crossen, Nicole Glaser, Hadley Sauers-Ford, Shelby Chen, Victoria Tran, James P Marcin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Introduction: Management of type 1 diabetes (T1D) is labor-intensive, requiring multiple daily blood glucose measurements and insulin injections. Patients are seen quarterly by providers, but evidence suggests more frequent contact is beneficial. Current technology allows secure, remote sharing of diabetes data and video-conferencing between providers and patients in their home settings. Methods: Home-based video visits were provided for six months to pediatric T1D patients with poor glycemic control, indicated by a hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) ≥8% at enrollment. Video visits were conducted every 4–8 weeks in addition to regularly scheduled clinic visits. Dates of clinic visits and HbA1c values were abstracted from the medical record at baseline and six months. Patients were surveyed at video visits regarding technical issues, and after six months a standardized survey was administered to assess satisfaction with video-based care. Results: A total of 57 patients enrolled and 36 completed six months of video visits. Patients completing six months averaged 4.0 video visits (SD 1.1). Their frequency of in-person care also increased from 3.2 clinic visits/year at baseline to 3.7 clinic visits/year during the study (P = 0.04). Mean HbA1c reduction among patients completing six months was 0.8% (95% CI 0.2–1.4%); 94% of these patients were “very satisfied” while 6% were “somewhat satisfied” with the experience. Discussion: This study demonstrates that home-based video visits are feasible and satisfactory for pediatric patients with poorly controlled T1D. Furthermore, use of video visits can improve frequency of subspecialty care and resulting glycemic control in this population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Telemedicine and Telecare
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Pediatrics
Ambulatory Care
Hemoglobins
Information Dissemination
Medical Records
Blood Glucose
Insulin
Technology
Injections
Population

Keywords

  • home telecare
  • remote consultation
  • Telemedicine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Informatics

Cite this

Home-based video visits for pediatric patients with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes. / Crossen, Stephanie; Glaser, Nicole; Sauers-Ford, Hadley; Chen, Shelby; Tran, Victoria; Marcin, James P.

In: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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