HIV test-seeking before and after the restriction of anonymous testing in North Carolina

Irva Hertz-Picciotto, Lester W. Lee, Cathrine Hoyo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives. This study assessed the impact on HIV test-seeking of North Carolina's restriction of anonymous testing to 18 of its 100 counties as of September 1, 1991. Methods. Trends from 4 months prerestriction to the 16- month restriction period in counties retaining vs counties eliminating anonymous testing were compared. Results. HIV testing increased throughout the state, but more rapidly where anonymous testing was retained than elsewhere: 64% vs 44%. These differences held for all sociodemographic subgroups and were most pronounced among adolescents and African Americans and other non-Whites. Conclusions. The data are consistent with a detrimental effect of elimination of anonymous testing, although confounding from differences in AIDS awareness or in repeat tests is possible.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1446-1450
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume86
Issue number10
StatePublished - Oct 1996
Externally publishedYes

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Anonymous Testing
HIV
African Americans
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

HIV test-seeking before and after the restriction of anonymous testing in North Carolina. / Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Lee, Lester W.; Hoyo, Cathrine.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 86, No. 10, 10.1996, p. 1446-1450.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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