High-throughput assay to phenotype salmonella enterica typhimurium association, invasion, and replication in macrophages

Jing Wu, Roberta Pugh, Richard C. Laughlin, Helene Andrews-Polymenis, Michael McClelland, Andreas J Baumler, L. Garry Adams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Salmonella species are zoonotic pathogens and leading causes of food borne illnesses in humans and livestock1. Understanding the mechanisms underlying Salmonella-host interactions are important to elucidate the molecular pathogenesis of Salmonella infection. The Gentamicin protection assay to phenotype Salmonella association, invasion and replication in phagocytic cells was adapted to allow high-throughput screening to define the roles of deletion mutants of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium in host interactions using RAW 264.7 murine macrophages. Under this protocol, the variance in measurements is significantly reduced compared to the standard protocol, because wild-type and multiple mutant strains can be tested in the same culture dish and at the same time. The use of multichannel pipettes increases the throughput and enhances precision. Furthermore, concerns related to using less host cells per well in 96-well culture dish were addressed. Here, the protocol of the modified in vitro Salmonella invasion assay using phagocytic cells was successfully employed to phenotype 38 individual Salmonella deletion mutants for association, invasion and intracellular replication. The in vitro phenotypes are presented, some of which were subsequently confirmed to have in vivo phenotypes in an animal model. Thus, the modified, standardized assay to phenotype Salmonella association, invasion and replication in macrophages with high-throughput capacity could be utilized more broadly to study bacterial-host interactions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere51759
JournalJournal of Visualized Experiments
Issue number90
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 11 2014

Fingerprint

Salmonella
Salmonella enterica
Macrophages
Salmonella typhimurium
Assays
Throughput
Association reactions
Phenotype
Phagocytes
Foodborne Diseases
Salmonella Infections
Zoonoses
Gentamicins
Pathogens
Animal Models
Screening
Animals

Keywords

  • Association
  • Infectious diseases
  • Intracellular pathogens
  • Invasion
  • Issue 90
  • Macrophages
  • Phenotype
  • Replication
  • Salmonella enterica typhimurium

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

High-throughput assay to phenotype salmonella enterica typhimurium association, invasion, and replication in macrophages. / Wu, Jing; Pugh, Roberta; Laughlin, Richard C.; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene; McClelland, Michael; Baumler, Andreas J; Adams, L. Garry.

In: Journal of Visualized Experiments, No. 90, e51759, 11.08.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wu, Jing ; Pugh, Roberta ; Laughlin, Richard C. ; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene ; McClelland, Michael ; Baumler, Andreas J ; Adams, L. Garry. / High-throughput assay to phenotype salmonella enterica typhimurium association, invasion, and replication in macrophages. In: Journal of Visualized Experiments. 2014 ; No. 90.
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