High-selenium yeast supplementation in free-living North American men: No effect on thyroid hormone metabolism or body composition

Wayne Chris Hawkes, Nancy L. Keim, B. Diane Richter, Mary B. Gustafson, Barbara Gale, Bruce E. Mackey, Ellen L. Bonnel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In a prior study, we observed decreased serum 3,3′,5-triiodothyronine (T3), increased serum thyrotropin and increased body weight in five men fed 297 μg/d of selenium (Se) in foods naturally high in Se while confined in a metabolic research unit. In an attempt to replicate and confirm those observations, we conducted a randomized study of high-Se yeast supplements (300 μg/d) or placebo yeast administered to 42 healthy free-living men for 48 weeks. Serum thyroxine, T3 and thyrotropin did not change in supplemented or control subjects. Body weight increased in both groups during the 48-week treatment period and remained elevated for the 48-week follow-up period. Body fat increased by 1.2 kg in both groups. Energy intake and voluntary activity levels were not different between the groups and remained unchanged during the treatment period. Dietary intakes of Se, macronutrients and micronutrients were not different between groups and remained unchanged during the treatment period. These results suggest that our previous observation of a hypothyroidal response to high-Se foods was confounded by some aspect of the particular foods used, or were merely chance observations. Because of the high dose and long administration period, the present study suggests that the effects of Se supplements on thyroid hormone metabolism and energy metabolism in healthy North American men with adequate Se status do not represent a significant risk for unhealthy weight gain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)131-142
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology
Volume22
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 5 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Selenium
Body Composition
Thyroid Hormones
Metabolism
Yeast
Yeasts
Chemical analysis
Thyrotropin
Food
Serum
Body Weight
Micronutrients
Triiodothyronine
Energy Intake
Thyroxine
Energy Metabolism
Weight Gain
Adipose Tissue
Therapeutics
Fats

Keywords

  • Body composition
  • Body weight
  • Selenium
  • Thyroid hormone

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

High-selenium yeast supplementation in free-living North American men : No effect on thyroid hormone metabolism or body composition. / Hawkes, Wayne Chris; Keim, Nancy L.; Diane Richter, B.; Gustafson, Mary B.; Gale, Barbara; Mackey, Bruce E.; Bonnel, Ellen L.

In: Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology, Vol. 22, No. 2, 05.06.2008, p. 131-142.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hawkes, Wayne Chris ; Keim, Nancy L. ; Diane Richter, B. ; Gustafson, Mary B. ; Gale, Barbara ; Mackey, Bruce E. ; Bonnel, Ellen L. / High-selenium yeast supplementation in free-living North American men : No effect on thyroid hormone metabolism or body composition. In: Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology. 2008 ; Vol. 22, No. 2. pp. 131-142.
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