High-rise syndrome in dogs: 81 cases (1985-1991).

L. E. Gordon, C. Thacher, Amy Kapatkin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We evaluated 81 dogs with high-rise syndrome. Dogs fell from 1 to 6 stories, and of 52 dogs for which the fall was witnessed, 39 had (75%) jumped. Dogs sustained a triad of injuries to the face, thorax, and extremities, similar to injuries seen in cats with high-rise syndrome, but with differences in degree and distribution. Height fallen and landing surface affected initial status and type and severity of injury. Cause of fall influenced distribution of extremity injury. Dogs falling < 3 stories had a high prevalence of extremity fractures. Higher falls resulted in more spinal injuries. We recommend initial treatment for shock and thoracic trauma followed by orthopedic and neurologic evaluation. Visceral trauma should be considered if response to emergency treatment is poor. All but 1 of the dogs survived.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)118-122
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Volume202
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 1993
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dogs
dogs
Wounds and Injuries
Extremities
Thorax
Spinal Injuries
Emergency Treatment
orthopedics
chest
thorax
nervous system
Nervous System
Orthopedics
Shock
Cats
cats
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Gordon, L. E., Thacher, C., & Kapatkin, A. (1993). High-rise syndrome in dogs: 81 cases (1985-1991). Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 202(1), 118-122.

High-rise syndrome in dogs : 81 cases (1985-1991). / Gordon, L. E.; Thacher, C.; Kapatkin, Amy.

In: Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, Vol. 202, No. 1, 01.01.1993, p. 118-122.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gordon, LE, Thacher, C & Kapatkin, A 1993, 'High-rise syndrome in dogs: 81 cases (1985-1991).', Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, vol. 202, no. 1, pp. 118-122.
Gordon, L. E. ; Thacher, C. ; Kapatkin, Amy. / High-rise syndrome in dogs : 81 cases (1985-1991). In: Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association. 1993 ; Vol. 202, No. 1. pp. 118-122.
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