High resolution 3D color flow mapping: Applied to the assessment of breast vasculature

K. Whittaker Ferrara, B. Zagar, J. Sokil-Melgar, V. R. Algazi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In order to develop a three dimensional (3D) color flow map of low velocity flow through small vessels, we explore the use of a high resolution velocity estimation technique and a new technique for the differentiation of regions of flow and stationary tissue. Following the transmission of a wideband signal, a signal processing strategy that tracks the motion of small regions of blood is used to estimate velocity. We find that the use of wideband transmission, with coherent estimation over a long pulse train, provides the opportunity to map very low velocity flow, and to detect flow at beam-vessel angles near 90°. The use of 3D continuity processing to differentiate flow and stationary tissue is shown to improve noise immunity. In-vitro and in-vivo velocity maps are presented. The 3D velocity profile is then constructed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)293-304
Number of pages12
JournalUltrasound in Medicine and Biology
Volume22
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1996
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

breast
Breast
Color
color
high resolution
Noise
Immunity
low speed
vessels
broadband
immunity
continuity
blood
signal processing
velocity distribution
estimates
pulses
In Vitro Techniques

Keywords

  • Blood flow
  • Color flow mapping
  • Doppler
  • Three dimensional ultrasound
  • Wall filter

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

High resolution 3D color flow mapping : Applied to the assessment of breast vasculature. / Ferrara, K. Whittaker; Zagar, B.; Sokil-Melgar, J.; Algazi, V. R.

In: Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology, Vol. 22, No. 3, 1996, p. 293-304.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ferrara, K. Whittaker ; Zagar, B. ; Sokil-Melgar, J. ; Algazi, V. R. / High resolution 3D color flow mapping : Applied to the assessment of breast vasculature. In: Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology. 1996 ; Vol. 22, No. 3. pp. 293-304.
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