High levels of inflammatory biomarkers are associated with increased allele-specific apolipoprotein(a) levels in African-Americans

Anuurad Erdembileg, Jill Rubin, Alan Chiem, Russell P. Tracy, Thomas A. Pearson, Lars Berglund

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: A role of inflammation for cardiovascular disease (CVD) is established. Lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] is an independent CVD risk factor where plasma levels are determined by the apolipoprotein(a) [apo(a)] gene, which contains inflammatory response elements. Design: We investigated the effect of inflammation on allele-specific apo(a) levels in African-Americans and Caucasians. We determined Lp(a) levels, apo(a) sizes, allele-specific apo(a) levels, fibrinogen and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in 167 African-Americans and 259 Caucasians. Results: Lp(a) levels were increased among African-Americans with higher vs. lower levels of CRP [<3 vs. ≥3 mg/liter (143 vs. 108 nmol/liter), P = 0.009] or fibrinogen (<340 vs. ≥340 mg/liter, P = 0.002). We next analyzed allele-specific apo(a) levels for different apo(a) sizes. No differences in allele-specific apo(a) levels across CRP or fibrinogen groups were seen among African-Americans or Caucasians for small apo(a) sizes (<22 kringle 4 repeats). Allele-specific apo(a) levels for medium apo(a) sizes (22-30 kringle 4 repeats) were significantly higher among African-Americans, with high levels of CRP or fibrinogen compared with those with low levels (88 vs. 67 nmol/liter, P = 0.014, and 91 vs. 59 nmol/liter, P = 0.0001, respectively). No difference was found for Caucasians. Conclusions: Increased levels of CRP or fibrinogen are associated with higher allele-specific medium-sized apo(a) levels in African-Americans but not in Caucasians. These findings indicate that proinflammatory conditions result in a selective increase in medium-sized apo(a) levels in African-Americans and suggest that inflammation-associated events may contribute to the interethnic difference in Lp(a) levels between African-Americans and Caucasians.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1482-1488
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume93
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2008

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Apoprotein(a)
Biomarkers
African Americans
Alleles
Lipoprotein(a)
C-Reactive Protein
Fibrinogen
Kringles
Inflammation
Cardiovascular Diseases
Response Elements

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

High levels of inflammatory biomarkers are associated with increased allele-specific apolipoprotein(a) levels in African-Americans. / Erdembileg, Anuurad; Rubin, Jill; Chiem, Alan; Tracy, Russell P.; Pearson, Thomas A.; Berglund, Lars.

In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, Vol. 93, No. 4, 04.2008, p. 1482-1488.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background: A role of inflammation for cardiovascular disease (CVD) is established. Lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] is an independent CVD risk factor where plasma levels are determined by the apolipoprotein(a) [apo(a)] gene, which contains inflammatory response elements. Design: We investigated the effect of inflammation on allele-specific apo(a) levels in African-Americans and Caucasians. We determined Lp(a) levels, apo(a) sizes, allele-specific apo(a) levels, fibrinogen and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in 167 African-Americans and 259 Caucasians. Results: Lp(a) levels were increased among African-Americans with higher vs. lower levels of CRP [<3 vs. ≥3 mg/liter (143 vs. 108 nmol/liter), P = 0.009] or fibrinogen (<340 vs. ≥340 mg/liter, P = 0.002). We next analyzed allele-specific apo(a) levels for different apo(a) sizes. No differences in allele-specific apo(a) levels across CRP or fibrinogen groups were seen among African-Americans or Caucasians for small apo(a) sizes (<22 kringle 4 repeats). Allele-specific apo(a) levels for medium apo(a) sizes (22-30 kringle 4 repeats) were significantly higher among African-Americans, with high levels of CRP or fibrinogen compared with those with low levels (88 vs. 67 nmol/liter, P = 0.014, and 91 vs. 59 nmol/liter, P = 0.0001, respectively). No difference was found for Caucasians. Conclusions: Increased levels of CRP or fibrinogen are associated with higher allele-specific medium-sized apo(a) levels in African-Americans but not in Caucasians. These findings indicate that proinflammatory conditions result in a selective increase in medium-sized apo(a) levels in African-Americans and suggest that inflammation-associated events may contribute to the interethnic difference in Lp(a) levels between African-Americans and Caucasians.",
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N2 - Background: A role of inflammation for cardiovascular disease (CVD) is established. Lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] is an independent CVD risk factor where plasma levels are determined by the apolipoprotein(a) [apo(a)] gene, which contains inflammatory response elements. Design: We investigated the effect of inflammation on allele-specific apo(a) levels in African-Americans and Caucasians. We determined Lp(a) levels, apo(a) sizes, allele-specific apo(a) levels, fibrinogen and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in 167 African-Americans and 259 Caucasians. Results: Lp(a) levels were increased among African-Americans with higher vs. lower levels of CRP [<3 vs. ≥3 mg/liter (143 vs. 108 nmol/liter), P = 0.009] or fibrinogen (<340 vs. ≥340 mg/liter, P = 0.002). We next analyzed allele-specific apo(a) levels for different apo(a) sizes. No differences in allele-specific apo(a) levels across CRP or fibrinogen groups were seen among African-Americans or Caucasians for small apo(a) sizes (<22 kringle 4 repeats). Allele-specific apo(a) levels for medium apo(a) sizes (22-30 kringle 4 repeats) were significantly higher among African-Americans, with high levels of CRP or fibrinogen compared with those with low levels (88 vs. 67 nmol/liter, P = 0.014, and 91 vs. 59 nmol/liter, P = 0.0001, respectively). No difference was found for Caucasians. Conclusions: Increased levels of CRP or fibrinogen are associated with higher allele-specific medium-sized apo(a) levels in African-Americans but not in Caucasians. These findings indicate that proinflammatory conditions result in a selective increase in medium-sized apo(a) levels in African-Americans and suggest that inflammation-associated events may contribute to the interethnic difference in Lp(a) levels between African-Americans and Caucasians.

AB - Background: A role of inflammation for cardiovascular disease (CVD) is established. Lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] is an independent CVD risk factor where plasma levels are determined by the apolipoprotein(a) [apo(a)] gene, which contains inflammatory response elements. Design: We investigated the effect of inflammation on allele-specific apo(a) levels in African-Americans and Caucasians. We determined Lp(a) levels, apo(a) sizes, allele-specific apo(a) levels, fibrinogen and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in 167 African-Americans and 259 Caucasians. Results: Lp(a) levels were increased among African-Americans with higher vs. lower levels of CRP [<3 vs. ≥3 mg/liter (143 vs. 108 nmol/liter), P = 0.009] or fibrinogen (<340 vs. ≥340 mg/liter, P = 0.002). We next analyzed allele-specific apo(a) levels for different apo(a) sizes. No differences in allele-specific apo(a) levels across CRP or fibrinogen groups were seen among African-Americans or Caucasians for small apo(a) sizes (<22 kringle 4 repeats). Allele-specific apo(a) levels for medium apo(a) sizes (22-30 kringle 4 repeats) were significantly higher among African-Americans, with high levels of CRP or fibrinogen compared with those with low levels (88 vs. 67 nmol/liter, P = 0.014, and 91 vs. 59 nmol/liter, P = 0.0001, respectively). No difference was found for Caucasians. Conclusions: Increased levels of CRP or fibrinogen are associated with higher allele-specific medium-sized apo(a) levels in African-Americans but not in Caucasians. These findings indicate that proinflammatory conditions result in a selective increase in medium-sized apo(a) levels in African-Americans and suggest that inflammation-associated events may contribute to the interethnic difference in Lp(a) levels between African-Americans and Caucasians.

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