High-frequency dynamics of ultrasound contrast agents

Yang Sun, Dustin E. Kruse, Paul A. Dayton, Katherine W. Ferrara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ultrasound contrast agents enhance echoes from the microvasculature and enable the visualization of flow in smaller vessels. Here, we optically and acoustically investigate microbubble oscillation and echoes following insonation with a 10 MHz center frequency pulse. A high-speed camera system with a temporal resolution of 10 ns, which provides two-dimensional (2-D) frame images and streak images, is used in optical experiments. Two confocally aligned transducers, transmitting at 10 MHz and receiving at 5 MHz, are used in acoustical experiments in order to detect subharmonic components. Results of a numerical evaluation of the modified Rayleigh-Plesset equation are used to predict the dynamics of a microbubble and are compared to results of in vitro experiments. From the optical observations of a single microbubble, nonlinear oscillation, destruction, and radiation force are observed. The maximum bubble expansion, resulting from insonation with a 20-cycle, 10-MHz linear chirp with a peak negative pressure of 3.5 MPa, has been evaluated. For an initial diameter ranging from 1.5 to 5 μm, a maximum diameter less than 8 μm is produced during insonation. Optical and acoustical experiments provide insight into the mechanisms of destruction, including fragmentation and active diffusion. High-frequency pulse transmission may provide the opportunity to detect contrast echoes resulting from a single pulse, may be robust in the presence of tissue motion, and may provide the opportunity to incorporate high-frequency ultrasound into destruction-replenishment techniques.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1981-1991
Number of pages11
JournalIEEE Transactions on Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics, and Frequency Control
Volume52
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2005

Fingerprint

destruction
echoes
Ultrasonics
pulses
Rayleigh equations
replenishment
oscillations
high speed cameras
Experiments
flow visualization
chirp
temporal resolution
vessels
High speed cameras
transducers
fragmentation
bubbles
Transducers
cycles
expansion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics

Cite this

High-frequency dynamics of ultrasound contrast agents. / Sun, Yang; Kruse, Dustin E.; Dayton, Paul A.; Ferrara, Katherine W.

In: IEEE Transactions on Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics, and Frequency Control, Vol. 52, No. 11, 11.2005, p. 1981-1991.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sun, Yang ; Kruse, Dustin E. ; Dayton, Paul A. ; Ferrara, Katherine W. / High-frequency dynamics of ultrasound contrast agents. In: IEEE Transactions on Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics, and Frequency Control. 2005 ; Vol. 52, No. 11. pp. 1981-1991.
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