Hemodynamic and regional blood flow responses to nicotine at rest and during exercise

J. David Symons, Charles L Stebbins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We hypothesized that nicotine compromises cardiovascular responses to dynamic exercise. Hemodynamic variables were measured in conscious miniswine before and at 2 min of nicotine infusion (20 μkg-1 · min-1; i.a.; N = 6) during resting conditions. Mean arterial pressure elevations (MAP; 14%) and plasma nicotine concentrations (49 ± 7 ng · ml-1) were similar to those elicited by cigarette smoking in humans. In addition, nicotine increased systemic vascular resistance (SVR; 56%), the heart rate x systolic blood pressure product (RPP; 11%), and regional vascular resistance in the left-ventricular, renal, and splanchnic circulations, while cardiac output decreased (CO; 23%) and skeletal muscle blood flow and vascular resistance were unaffected. Plasma norepinephrine and epinephrine increased by ≃30% and 90%, respectively. On separate days, the same hemodynamic responses were measured before and at 20 min of treadmill running during vehicle or nicotine infusion for the last 2 min of exercise (N = 10). Nicotine increased MAP (6%), SVR (14%), and RPP (3%), and elevated vascular resistance in the proximal colon and pancreas. Moreover, compared to exercise + vehicle, norepinephrine and epinephrine increased by ≃13% and 24%, respectively, during exercise + nicotine infusion. These findings suggest that the detrimental effects of nicotine observed at rest are minimized during exercise. Nicotine's effects may be reduced during exercise by competition from local vasodilators in the heart and active musculature, and/or by differing activation of sympathetic nerve activity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)457-467
Number of pages11
JournalMedicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
Volume28
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1996

Fingerprint

Regional Blood Flow
Nicotine
Hemodynamics
Vascular Resistance
Epinephrine
Norepinephrine
Splanchnic Circulation
Blood Pressure
Renal Circulation
Carbon Monoxide
Vasodilator Agents
Running
Cardiac Output
Pancreas
Arterial Pressure
Colon
Skeletal Muscle
Heart Rate
Smoking

Keywords

  • CATECHOLAMINES
  • CORONARY CIRCULATION
  • MINISWINE
  • REGIONAL VASCULAR RESISTANCE
  • SKELETAL MUSCLE CIRCULATION
  • SMOKING
  • SPLANCHNIC CIRCULATION

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Hemodynamic and regional blood flow responses to nicotine at rest and during exercise. / Symons, J. David; Stebbins, Charles L.

In: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, Vol. 28, No. 4, 1996, p. 457-467.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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