Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with an increased rate of diabetes

Christie Y. Jeon, Mary N. Haan, Caroline Cheng, Erin R. Clayton, Elizabeth R. Mayeda, Joshua W. Miller, Allison E. Aiello

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

113 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE - Chronic infections could be contributing to the socioeconomic gradient in chronic diseases. Although chronic infections have been associated with increased levels of inflammatory cytokines and cardiovascular disease, there is limited evidence on how infections affect risk of diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - We examined the association between serological evidence of chronic viral and bacterial infections and incident diabetes in a prospective cohort of Latino elderly. We analyzed data on 782 individuals aged >60 years and diabetes-free in 1998-1999, whose blood was tested for antibodies to herpes simplex virus 1, varicella virus, cytomegalovirus, Helicobacter pylori, and Toxoplasma gondii and who were followed until June 2008. We used Cox proportional hazards regression to estimate the relative incidence rate of diabetes by serostatus, with adjustment for age, sex, education, cardiovascular disease, smoking, and cholesterol levels. RESULTS - Individuals seropositive for herpes simplex virus 1, varicella virus, cytomegalovirus, and T. gondii did not show an increased rate of diabetes, whereas those who were seropositive for H. pylori at enrollment were 2.7 times more likely at any given time to develop diabetes than seronegative individuals (hazard ratio 2.69 [95% CI 1.10-6.60]). Controlling for insulin resistance, C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 did not attenuate the effect of H. pylori infection. CONCLUSIONS - We demonstrated for the first time that H. pylori infection leads to an increased rate of incident diabetes in a prospective cohort study. Our findings implicate a potential role for antibiotic and gastrointestinal treatment in preventing diabetes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)520-525
Number of pages6
JournalDiabetes Care
Volume35
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2012

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Helicobacter Infections
Helicobacter pylori
Chickenpox
Toxoplasma
Human Herpesvirus 1
Cytomegalovirus
Cardiovascular Diseases
Infection
Viruses
Sex Education
Virus Diseases
Hispanic Americans
Bacterial Infections
C-Reactive Protein
Insulin Resistance
Interleukin-6
Chronic Disease
Cohort Studies
Research Design
Smoking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

Cite this

Jeon, C. Y., Haan, M. N., Cheng, C., Clayton, E. R., Mayeda, E. R., Miller, J. W., & Aiello, A. E. (2012). Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with an increased rate of diabetes. Diabetes Care, 35(3), 520-525. https://doi.org/10.2337/dc11-1043

Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with an increased rate of diabetes. / Jeon, Christie Y.; Haan, Mary N.; Cheng, Caroline; Clayton, Erin R.; Mayeda, Elizabeth R.; Miller, Joshua W.; Aiello, Allison E.

In: Diabetes Care, Vol. 35, No. 3, 03.2012, p. 520-525.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jeon, CY, Haan, MN, Cheng, C, Clayton, ER, Mayeda, ER, Miller, JW & Aiello, AE 2012, 'Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with an increased rate of diabetes', Diabetes Care, vol. 35, no. 3, pp. 520-525. https://doi.org/10.2337/dc11-1043
Jeon CY, Haan MN, Cheng C, Clayton ER, Mayeda ER, Miller JW et al. Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with an increased rate of diabetes. Diabetes Care. 2012 Mar;35(3):520-525. https://doi.org/10.2337/dc11-1043
Jeon, Christie Y. ; Haan, Mary N. ; Cheng, Caroline ; Clayton, Erin R. ; Mayeda, Elizabeth R. ; Miller, Joshua W. ; Aiello, Allison E. / Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with an increased rate of diabetes. In: Diabetes Care. 2012 ; Vol. 35, No. 3. pp. 520-525.
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