Health literacy and health-related knowledge among persons living with HIV/AIDS

Seth C. Kalichman, Eric Benotsch, Troy Suarez, Sheryl L Catz, Jeff Miller, David Rompa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

194 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Functional health literacy is associated with illness-related knowledge, understanding, and treatment perceptions for several chronic illnesses. This study examined health literacy in relation to knowledge and understanding of HIV/AIDS. Methods: Persons living with HIV/AIDS recruited from AIDS service organizations and HIV clinics completed the Test of Functional Health Literacy for Adults (TOFHLA) reading comprehension scale and measures of health status, knowledge and understanding of health status, perceptions of primary care givers, and perceptions of anti-HIV treatments. Results: Eighteen percent of the sample scored below the cutoff for marginal functional health literacy on the TOFHLA. Controlling for years of education, persons of lower health literacy were significantly less likely to have an undetectable HIV viral load, somewhat less likely to know their CD4 cell count and viral load, and lower health-literacy persons who knew their CD4 count and viral load were less likely to understand their meaning. Lower health literacy was also related to misperceptions that anti-HIV treatments reduce risks for sexually transmitting HIV and beliefs that anti-HIV treatments can relax safer-sex practices. Conclusions: Poor health literacy creates barriers to fully understanding one's health, illness, and treatments. Misperceptions of treatment in the case of HIV infection creates danger for potentially transmitting treatment-resistant strains of HIV. These results have implications for patient education and treatment programming for people who have poor health-literacy skills and are living with HIV/AIDS. Copyright (C) 2000 American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)325-331
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Preventive Medicine
Volume18
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Health Literacy
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
HIV
Health
Viral Load
Therapeutics
CD4 Lymphocyte Count
Health Status
Safe Sex
Patient Education
Caregivers
HIV Infections
Reading
Primary Health Care
Chronic Disease
Organizations

Keywords

  • Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome
  • Educational status
  • Health status
  • HIV
  • Knowledge

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Health literacy and health-related knowledge among persons living with HIV/AIDS. / Kalichman, Seth C.; Benotsch, Eric; Suarez, Troy; Catz, Sheryl L; Miller, Jeff; Rompa, David.

In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Vol. 18, No. 4, 05.2000, p. 325-331.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kalichman, Seth C. ; Benotsch, Eric ; Suarez, Troy ; Catz, Sheryl L ; Miller, Jeff ; Rompa, David. / Health literacy and health-related knowledge among persons living with HIV/AIDS. In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine. 2000 ; Vol. 18, No. 4. pp. 325-331.
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