Health care utilization and adults who are deaf: Relationship with age at onset of deafness

Steven Barnett, Peter Franks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

64 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives. To evaluate the health care utilization of a nationally representative sample of U.S. deaf adults while accounting for the age at onset of deafness, an indicator of linguistic and sociocultural group affiliation. Data Sources/Study Setting. Data from the 1990 to 1991 National Health Interview Surveys, the most recent years the Hearing Supplement was administered. The data were collected during in-home interviews of a sample of the U.S. civilian noninstitutionalized population. Study Design. Cross-sectional analyses comparing health-related measures of adults deafened before (prelingually) and after (postlingually) the age of 3 and those of a representative sample of the general population, adjusting for sociodemographics and health status. Key measures were physician visits and preventive health care services utilization. Principal Findings. Compared with the general population, prelingually deafened adults had fewer physician visits and were less likely to have visited a physician in the preceding 2 years, whereas postlingually deafened adults had more physician visits and were more likely to have visited a physician in the preceding 2 years. Postlingually deafened women were less likely to have had a mammogram within the previous 2 years. Conclusions. In terms of health care utilization, the deaf population is heterogeneous. Prelingually deafened adults' use of health care is similar to that of other language minority groups. Postlingually deafened adults' use of health care services appears similar to people with chronic illness. Future studies must distinguish different groups of people with hearing loss in order to identify barriers and monitor improvements in health care services access.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)105-120
Number of pages16
JournalHealth Services Research
Volume37
Issue number1
StatePublished - 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Patient Acceptance of Health Care
deafness
Deafness
Age of Onset
utilization
health care
Physicians
physician
Preventive Health Services
health care services
Delivery of Health Care
Population
Health Services
Interviews
Minority Groups
Information Storage and Retrieval
civilian population
Linguistics
Health Surveys
Hearing Loss

Keywords

  • Deafness
  • Health services utilization
  • Hearing disorders
  • Hearing impaired persons

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Professions(all)
  • Health Policy

Cite this

Health care utilization and adults who are deaf : Relationship with age at onset of deafness. / Barnett, Steven; Franks, Peter.

In: Health Services Research, Vol. 37, No. 1, 2002, p. 105-120.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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