Health care avoidance among people with serious psychological distress: Analyses of 2007 Health Information National Trends Survey

Jiali Ye, Ruth Shim, George Rust

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

Using data of 2007 Health Information National Trends Survey, we investigated the association between individuals' psychological distress and their reported avoidance of medical care and assessed whether people with serious psychological distress (SPD) were more likely to report psychosocial barriers to care. After controlling for demographic and health characteristics, individuals with SPD were more likely than those without SPD to report having avoided visiting a doctor even when they suspected they should (OR51.64, 95% CI51.08-2.48). The distressed individuals were also more likely to agree that they avoided a doctor because of fear of having a serious illness (OR51.99, 95% CI51.15-3.44) or thinking about dying (OR52.15, 95% CI51.12-4.11). Further understanding of the mechanism under which an individuals' mental health status may influence their perceived need for health and their use of medical services would improve the interface between mental health and primary care services.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1620-1629
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved
Volume23
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Access to care
  • Health care
  • Health needs
  • Psychological distress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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