HDL-subpopulation patterns in response to reductions in dietary total and saturated fat intakes in healthy subjects

Lars Berglund, Elizabeth H. Oliver, Nelson Fontanez, Steve Holleran, Karen Matthews, Paul S. Roheim, Henry N. Ginsberg, Rajasekhar Ramakrishnan, Michael Lefevre

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Little information is available about HDL subpopulations during dietary changes. Objective: The objective was to investigate the effect of reductions in total and saturated fat intakes on HDL subpopulations. Design: Multiracial, young and elderly men and women (n = 103) participating in the double-blind, randomized DELTA (Dietary Effects on Lipoproteins and Thrombogenic Activities) Study consumed 3 different diets, each for 8 wk: an average American diet (AAD: 34.3% total fat, 15.0% saturated fat), the American Heart Association Step I diet (28.6% total fat, 9.0% saturated fat), and a diet low in saturated fat (25.3% total fat, 6.1% saturated fat). Results: HDL2-cholesterol concentrations, by differential precipitation, decreased (P < 0.001) in a stepwise fashion after the reduction of total and saturated fat: 0.58 ± 0.21, 0.53 ± 0.19, and 0.48 ± 0.18 mmol/L with the AAD, Step I, and low-fat diets, respectively. HDL3 cholesterol decreased (P < 0.01) less: 0.76 ± 0.13, 0.73 ± 0.12, and 0.72 ± 0.11 mmol/L with the AAD, Step I, and low-fat diets, respectively. As measured by nondenaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, the larger-size HDL(2b) subpopulation decreased with the reduction in dietary fat, and a corresponding relative increase was seen for the smaller-sized HDL(3a, 3b), and (3c) subpopulations (P < 0.01). HDL2-cholesterol concentrations correlated negatively with serum triacylglycerol concentrations on all 3 diets: r = -0.46, -0.37, and -0.45 with the AAD, Step I, and low-fat diets, respectively (P < 0.0001). A similar negative correlation was seen for HDL(2b), whereas HDL(3a, 3b,) and (3c) correlated positively with triacylglycerol concentrations. Diet-induced changes in serum triacylglycerol were negatively correlated with changes in HDL2 and HDL(2b) cholesterol. Conclusions: A reduction in dietary total and saturated fat decreased both large (HDL2 and HDL(2b)) and small, dense HDL subpopulations, although decreases in HDL2 and HDL(2b) were most pronounced.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)992-1000
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume70
Issue number6
StatePublished - Dec 1999
Externally publishedYes

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fat intake
Healthy Volunteers
Fats
Fat-Restricted Diet
low fat diet
cholesterol
diet
HDL Cholesterol
Diet
triacylglycerols
Triglycerides
lipids
saturated fats
dietary fat
lipoproteins
gel electrophoresis
Dietary Fats
Serum
Lipoproteins
Electrophoresis

Keywords

  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Diet
  • HDL subpopulations
  • Lipoproteins
  • Nutrition
  • Race
  • Saturated fat
  • Triacylglycerols
  • Women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science

Cite this

Berglund, L., Oliver, E. H., Fontanez, N., Holleran, S., Matthews, K., Roheim, P. S., ... Lefevre, M. (1999). HDL-subpopulation patterns in response to reductions in dietary total and saturated fat intakes in healthy subjects. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 70(6), 992-1000.

HDL-subpopulation patterns in response to reductions in dietary total and saturated fat intakes in healthy subjects. / Berglund, Lars; Oliver, Elizabeth H.; Fontanez, Nelson; Holleran, Steve; Matthews, Karen; Roheim, Paul S.; Ginsberg, Henry N.; Ramakrishnan, Rajasekhar; Lefevre, Michael.

In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 70, No. 6, 12.1999, p. 992-1000.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Berglund, L, Oliver, EH, Fontanez, N, Holleran, S, Matthews, K, Roheim, PS, Ginsberg, HN, Ramakrishnan, R & Lefevre, M 1999, 'HDL-subpopulation patterns in response to reductions in dietary total and saturated fat intakes in healthy subjects', American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 70, no. 6, pp. 992-1000.
Berglund, Lars ; Oliver, Elizabeth H. ; Fontanez, Nelson ; Holleran, Steve ; Matthews, Karen ; Roheim, Paul S. ; Ginsberg, Henry N. ; Ramakrishnan, Rajasekhar ; Lefevre, Michael. / HDL-subpopulation patterns in response to reductions in dietary total and saturated fat intakes in healthy subjects. In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1999 ; Vol. 70, No. 6. pp. 992-1000.
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abstract = "Background: Little information is available about HDL subpopulations during dietary changes. Objective: The objective was to investigate the effect of reductions in total and saturated fat intakes on HDL subpopulations. Design: Multiracial, young and elderly men and women (n = 103) participating in the double-blind, randomized DELTA (Dietary Effects on Lipoproteins and Thrombogenic Activities) Study consumed 3 different diets, each for 8 wk: an average American diet (AAD: 34.3{\%} total fat, 15.0{\%} saturated fat), the American Heart Association Step I diet (28.6{\%} total fat, 9.0{\%} saturated fat), and a diet low in saturated fat (25.3{\%} total fat, 6.1{\%} saturated fat). Results: HDL2-cholesterol concentrations, by differential precipitation, decreased (P < 0.001) in a stepwise fashion after the reduction of total and saturated fat: 0.58 ± 0.21, 0.53 ± 0.19, and 0.48 ± 0.18 mmol/L with the AAD, Step I, and low-fat diets, respectively. HDL3 cholesterol decreased (P < 0.01) less: 0.76 ± 0.13, 0.73 ± 0.12, and 0.72 ± 0.11 mmol/L with the AAD, Step I, and low-fat diets, respectively. As measured by nondenaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, the larger-size HDL(2b) subpopulation decreased with the reduction in dietary fat, and a corresponding relative increase was seen for the smaller-sized HDL(3a, 3b), and (3c) subpopulations (P < 0.01). HDL2-cholesterol concentrations correlated negatively with serum triacylglycerol concentrations on all 3 diets: r = -0.46, -0.37, and -0.45 with the AAD, Step I, and low-fat diets, respectively (P < 0.0001). A similar negative correlation was seen for HDL(2b), whereas HDL(3a, 3b,) and (3c) correlated positively with triacylglycerol concentrations. Diet-induced changes in serum triacylglycerol were negatively correlated with changes in HDL2 and HDL(2b) cholesterol. Conclusions: A reduction in dietary total and saturated fat decreased both large (HDL2 and HDL(2b)) and small, dense HDL subpopulations, although decreases in HDL2 and HDL(2b) were most pronounced.",
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AU - Berglund, Lars

AU - Oliver, Elizabeth H.

AU - Fontanez, Nelson

AU - Holleran, Steve

AU - Matthews, Karen

AU - Roheim, Paul S.

AU - Ginsberg, Henry N.

AU - Ramakrishnan, Rajasekhar

AU - Lefevre, Michael

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N2 - Background: Little information is available about HDL subpopulations during dietary changes. Objective: The objective was to investigate the effect of reductions in total and saturated fat intakes on HDL subpopulations. Design: Multiracial, young and elderly men and women (n = 103) participating in the double-blind, randomized DELTA (Dietary Effects on Lipoproteins and Thrombogenic Activities) Study consumed 3 different diets, each for 8 wk: an average American diet (AAD: 34.3% total fat, 15.0% saturated fat), the American Heart Association Step I diet (28.6% total fat, 9.0% saturated fat), and a diet low in saturated fat (25.3% total fat, 6.1% saturated fat). Results: HDL2-cholesterol concentrations, by differential precipitation, decreased (P < 0.001) in a stepwise fashion after the reduction of total and saturated fat: 0.58 ± 0.21, 0.53 ± 0.19, and 0.48 ± 0.18 mmol/L with the AAD, Step I, and low-fat diets, respectively. HDL3 cholesterol decreased (P < 0.01) less: 0.76 ± 0.13, 0.73 ± 0.12, and 0.72 ± 0.11 mmol/L with the AAD, Step I, and low-fat diets, respectively. As measured by nondenaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, the larger-size HDL(2b) subpopulation decreased with the reduction in dietary fat, and a corresponding relative increase was seen for the smaller-sized HDL(3a, 3b), and (3c) subpopulations (P < 0.01). HDL2-cholesterol concentrations correlated negatively with serum triacylglycerol concentrations on all 3 diets: r = -0.46, -0.37, and -0.45 with the AAD, Step I, and low-fat diets, respectively (P < 0.0001). A similar negative correlation was seen for HDL(2b), whereas HDL(3a, 3b,) and (3c) correlated positively with triacylglycerol concentrations. Diet-induced changes in serum triacylglycerol were negatively correlated with changes in HDL2 and HDL(2b) cholesterol. Conclusions: A reduction in dietary total and saturated fat decreased both large (HDL2 and HDL(2b)) and small, dense HDL subpopulations, although decreases in HDL2 and HDL(2b) were most pronounced.

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KW - Saturated fat

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