Harnessing cognitive neuroscience to develop new treatments for improving cognition in schizophrenia: CNTRICS selected cognitive paradigms for animal models

Holly Moore, Mark A. Geyer, Cameron S Carter, Deanna M. Barch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Over the past two decades, the awareness of the disabling and treatment-refractory effects of impaired cognition in schizophrenia has increased dramatically. In response to this still unmet need in the treatment of schizophrenia, the Cognitive Neuroscience Treatment Research to Improve Cognition in Schizophrenia (CNTRICS) initiative was developed. The goal of CNTRICS is to harness cognitive neuro-science to develop a brain-based set of tools for measuring cognition in schizophrenia and to test new treatments. CNTRICS meetings focused on development of tasks with cognitive construct validity for use in both human and animal model studies. This special issue presents papers discussing the cognitive test-ing paradigms selected by CNTRICS for animal model systems. These paradigms are designed to measure cognitive constructs within the domains of perception, attention, executive function, working memory, object/relational long-term memory, and social/affective processes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2087-2091
Number of pages5
JournalNeuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews
Volume37
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2013

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Cognition
Schizophrenia
Animal Models
Research
Therapeutics
Cognitive Science
Long-Term Memory
Executive Function
Cognitive Neuroscience
Short-Term Memory
Brain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

Cite this

Harnessing cognitive neuroscience to develop new treatments for improving cognition in schizophrenia : CNTRICS selected cognitive paradigms for animal models. / Moore, Holly; Geyer, Mark A.; Carter, Cameron S; Barch, Deanna M.

In: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, Vol. 37, No. 9, 11.2013, p. 2087-2091.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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