Hand/Face/Neck Localized Pattern

Sticky Problems-Resins

Lauren Y. Cao, Apra Sood, James S. Taylor

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Plastic resin systems have an increasingly diverse array of applications but also induce health hazards, the most common of which are allergic and irritant contact dermatitis. Contact urticaria, pigmentary changes, and photoallergic contact dermatitis may occasionally occur. Other health effects, especially respiratory and neurologic signs and symptoms, have also been reported. These resin systems include epoxies, the most frequent synthetic resin systems to cause contact dermatitis, (meth)acrylics, polyurethanes, phenol-formaldehydes, polyesters, amino resins (melamine-formaldehydes, urea-formaldehydes), polyvinyls, polystyrenes, polyolefins, polyamides and polycarbonates. Contact dermatitis usually occurs as a result of exposure to the monomers and additives in the occupational setting, although reports from consumers, using the raw materials or end products periodically surface. Resin- and additive-induced direct contact dermatitis usually presents on the hands, fingers, and forearms, while facial, eyelid, and neck involvement may occur through indirect contact, eg, via the hands, or from airborne exposure. Patch testing with commercially available materials, and in some cases the patient's own resins, is important for diagnosis. Industrial hygiene prevention techniques are essential to reduce contact dermatitis when handling these resin systems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)227-249
Number of pages23
JournalDermatologic Clinics
Volume27
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Contact Dermatitis
Neck
Hand
polycarbonate
Formaldehyde
Respiratory Signs and Symptoms
Photoallergic Dermatitis
Synthetic Resins
Irritant Dermatitis
Polyvinyls
Allergic Contact Dermatitis
Polyesters
Polyurethanes
Polystyrenes
Nylons
Urticaria
Health
Occupational Health
Eyelids
Neurologic Manifestations

Keywords

  • (Meth)acrylic
  • Allergic contact dermatitis
  • Epoxy
  • Irritant contact dermatitis
  • Phenol-formaldehyde
  • Plastic
  • Polyurethane
  • Resin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

Cite this

Hand/Face/Neck Localized Pattern : Sticky Problems-Resins. / Cao, Lauren Y.; Sood, Apra; Taylor, James S.

In: Dermatologic Clinics, Vol. 27, No. 3, 01.07.2009, p. 227-249.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Cao, Lauren Y. ; Sood, Apra ; Taylor, James S. / Hand/Face/Neck Localized Pattern : Sticky Problems-Resins. In: Dermatologic Clinics. 2009 ; Vol. 27, No. 3. pp. 227-249.
@article{490575396e984715906c756f020bac8a,
title = "Hand/Face/Neck Localized Pattern: Sticky Problems-Resins",
abstract = "Plastic resin systems have an increasingly diverse array of applications but also induce health hazards, the most common of which are allergic and irritant contact dermatitis. Contact urticaria, pigmentary changes, and photoallergic contact dermatitis may occasionally occur. Other health effects, especially respiratory and neurologic signs and symptoms, have also been reported. These resin systems include epoxies, the most frequent synthetic resin systems to cause contact dermatitis, (meth)acrylics, polyurethanes, phenol-formaldehydes, polyesters, amino resins (melamine-formaldehydes, urea-formaldehydes), polyvinyls, polystyrenes, polyolefins, polyamides and polycarbonates. Contact dermatitis usually occurs as a result of exposure to the monomers and additives in the occupational setting, although reports from consumers, using the raw materials or end products periodically surface. Resin- and additive-induced direct contact dermatitis usually presents on the hands, fingers, and forearms, while facial, eyelid, and neck involvement may occur through indirect contact, eg, via the hands, or from airborne exposure. Patch testing with commercially available materials, and in some cases the patient's own resins, is important for diagnosis. Industrial hygiene prevention techniques are essential to reduce contact dermatitis when handling these resin systems.",
keywords = "(Meth)acrylic, Allergic contact dermatitis, Epoxy, Irritant contact dermatitis, Phenol-formaldehyde, Plastic, Polyurethane, Resin",
author = "Cao, {Lauren Y.} and Apra Sood and Taylor, {James S.}",
year = "2009",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.det.2009.05.012",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "27",
pages = "227--249",
journal = "Dermatologic Clinics",
issn = "0733-8635",
publisher = "W.B. Saunders Ltd",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Hand/Face/Neck Localized Pattern

T2 - Sticky Problems-Resins

AU - Cao, Lauren Y.

AU - Sood, Apra

AU - Taylor, James S.

PY - 2009/7/1

Y1 - 2009/7/1

N2 - Plastic resin systems have an increasingly diverse array of applications but also induce health hazards, the most common of which are allergic and irritant contact dermatitis. Contact urticaria, pigmentary changes, and photoallergic contact dermatitis may occasionally occur. Other health effects, especially respiratory and neurologic signs and symptoms, have also been reported. These resin systems include epoxies, the most frequent synthetic resin systems to cause contact dermatitis, (meth)acrylics, polyurethanes, phenol-formaldehydes, polyesters, amino resins (melamine-formaldehydes, urea-formaldehydes), polyvinyls, polystyrenes, polyolefins, polyamides and polycarbonates. Contact dermatitis usually occurs as a result of exposure to the monomers and additives in the occupational setting, although reports from consumers, using the raw materials or end products periodically surface. Resin- and additive-induced direct contact dermatitis usually presents on the hands, fingers, and forearms, while facial, eyelid, and neck involvement may occur through indirect contact, eg, via the hands, or from airborne exposure. Patch testing with commercially available materials, and in some cases the patient's own resins, is important for diagnosis. Industrial hygiene prevention techniques are essential to reduce contact dermatitis when handling these resin systems.

AB - Plastic resin systems have an increasingly diverse array of applications but also induce health hazards, the most common of which are allergic and irritant contact dermatitis. Contact urticaria, pigmentary changes, and photoallergic contact dermatitis may occasionally occur. Other health effects, especially respiratory and neurologic signs and symptoms, have also been reported. These resin systems include epoxies, the most frequent synthetic resin systems to cause contact dermatitis, (meth)acrylics, polyurethanes, phenol-formaldehydes, polyesters, amino resins (melamine-formaldehydes, urea-formaldehydes), polyvinyls, polystyrenes, polyolefins, polyamides and polycarbonates. Contact dermatitis usually occurs as a result of exposure to the monomers and additives in the occupational setting, although reports from consumers, using the raw materials or end products periodically surface. Resin- and additive-induced direct contact dermatitis usually presents on the hands, fingers, and forearms, while facial, eyelid, and neck involvement may occur through indirect contact, eg, via the hands, or from airborne exposure. Patch testing with commercially available materials, and in some cases the patient's own resins, is important for diagnosis. Industrial hygiene prevention techniques are essential to reduce contact dermatitis when handling these resin systems.

KW - (Meth)acrylic

KW - Allergic contact dermatitis

KW - Epoxy

KW - Irritant contact dermatitis

KW - Phenol-formaldehyde

KW - Plastic

KW - Polyurethane

KW - Resin

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=67649472541&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=67649472541&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.det.2009.05.012

DO - 10.1016/j.det.2009.05.012

M3 - Review article

VL - 27

SP - 227

EP - 249

JO - Dermatologic Clinics

JF - Dermatologic Clinics

SN - 0733-8635

IS - 3

ER -