Growth of breast-fed and formula-fed infants from 0 to 18 months: The DARLING study

K. G. Dewey, M. J. Heinig, L. A. Nommsen, J. M. Peerson, B. Lonnerdal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

303 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Anthropometric data were collected monthly from birth to 18 months as part of the Davis Area Research on Lactation, Infant Nutrition and Growth study, which followed infants who were either breast-fed or formula-fed during the first 12 months. The two cohorts were matched for parental socioeconomic status, education, ethnic group, and anthropometric characteristics and for infant sex and birth weight, and neither group was given solid foods before 4 months. While mean weight of formula-fed infants remained at or above the National Center for Health Statistics median throughout the first 18 months, mean weight of breast-fed infants dropped below the median beginning at 6 to 8 months and was significantly lower than that of the formula-fed group between 6 and 18 months. In contrast, length and head circumference values were similar between groups. Weight-for-length z scores were significantly different between 4 and 18 months, suggesting that breast-fed infants were leaner. The groups had similar weight gain during the first 3 months, but breast-fed infants gained less rapidly during the remainder of the first year: cumulative weight gain in the first 12 months was 0.65 kg less in the breast-fed group. Length gain was similar between groups. These results indicate that weight patterns of breast-fed infants, even in a population of high socioeconomic status, differ from current reference data and from those of formula-fed infants. Thus, new growth charts based on breast-fed infants are needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1035-1041
Number of pages7
JournalPediatrics
Volume89
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1992

Fingerprint

Infant Formula
Breast
Growth
Weights and Measures
Social Class
Weight Gain
Growth Charts
National Center for Health Statistics (U.S.)
Ethnic Groups
Lactation
Birth Weight
Sex Characteristics
Head
Parturition
Education
Food
Research

Keywords

  • anthropometry
  • breast-feeding
  • formula-feeding
  • growth
  • infant-feeding practices
  • length
  • weight

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Dewey, K. G., Heinig, M. J., Nommsen, L. A., Peerson, J. M., & Lonnerdal, B. (1992). Growth of breast-fed and formula-fed infants from 0 to 18 months: The DARLING study. Pediatrics, 89(6), 1035-1041.

Growth of breast-fed and formula-fed infants from 0 to 18 months : The DARLING study. / Dewey, K. G.; Heinig, M. J.; Nommsen, L. A.; Peerson, J. M.; Lonnerdal, B.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 89, No. 6, 1992, p. 1035-1041.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dewey, KG, Heinig, MJ, Nommsen, LA, Peerson, JM & Lonnerdal, B 1992, 'Growth of breast-fed and formula-fed infants from 0 to 18 months: The DARLING study', Pediatrics, vol. 89, no. 6, pp. 1035-1041.
Dewey KG, Heinig MJ, Nommsen LA, Peerson JM, Lonnerdal B. Growth of breast-fed and formula-fed infants from 0 to 18 months: The DARLING study. Pediatrics. 1992;89(6):1035-1041.
Dewey, K. G. ; Heinig, M. J. ; Nommsen, L. A. ; Peerson, J. M. ; Lonnerdal, B. / Growth of breast-fed and formula-fed infants from 0 to 18 months : The DARLING study. In: Pediatrics. 1992 ; Vol. 89, No. 6. pp. 1035-1041.
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