Growth hormone treatment for short stature

G. Van Vliet, Dennis M Styne, S. L. Kaplan, M. M. Grumbach

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

167 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Fifteen short but otherwise normal children, 4.3 to 15.5 years old, with heights >3 S.D. below the mean value for age, growth rates ≤5.0 cm per year, and normal serum levels of immunoreactive growth hormone in response to provocative stimuli (peak ≥10 ng per milliliter) were treated with intramuscular injections of pituitary growth hormone (0.1 U per kilogram) 3 times weekly for 6 months, as were 14 children with documented growth hormone deficiency. In all the latter children growth rate increased by more than 2.0 cm per year during treatment. In 6 of the 14 short normal children who remained prepubertal, growth rate also increased, by 2.2 to 4.2 cm per year during treatment; 4 of these children had normal base-line serum somatomedin C concentrations. In both short normal children and children with growth hormone deficiency, the increment in serum somatomedin C concentrations after 4 or 10 daily injections of growth hormone correlated with bone age but not with later growth or growth hormone levels. Among the short normal children, those who responded to growth hormone were younger and had a greater delay in bone age and a slower pretreatment growth rate than the nonresponders. These observations suggest that a dose of growth hormone comparable to that used for the treatment of hypopituitarism increases growth rate in some short normal children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1016-1022
Number of pages7
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume309
Issue number17
StatePublished - 1983

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Growth Hormone
Growth
Therapeutics
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I
Serum
Bone and Bones
Hypopituitarism
Intramuscular Injections
Injections

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Van Vliet, G., Styne, D. M., Kaplan, S. L., & Grumbach, M. M. (1983). Growth hormone treatment for short stature. New England Journal of Medicine, 309(17), 1016-1022.

Growth hormone treatment for short stature. / Van Vliet, G.; Styne, Dennis M; Kaplan, S. L.; Grumbach, M. M.

In: New England Journal of Medicine, Vol. 309, No. 17, 1983, p. 1016-1022.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Van Vliet, G, Styne, DM, Kaplan, SL & Grumbach, MM 1983, 'Growth hormone treatment for short stature', New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 309, no. 17, pp. 1016-1022.
Van Vliet G, Styne DM, Kaplan SL, Grumbach MM. Growth hormone treatment for short stature. New England Journal of Medicine. 1983;309(17):1016-1022.
Van Vliet, G. ; Styne, Dennis M ; Kaplan, S. L. ; Grumbach, M. M. / Growth hormone treatment for short stature. In: New England Journal of Medicine. 1983 ; Vol. 309, No. 17. pp. 1016-1022.
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