Growth and decline in language and phonological memory over two years among adolescents with down syndrome

Frances A. Conners, Andrew S. Tungate, Leonard J Abbeduto, Edward C. Merrill, Gayle G. Faught

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Forty-two adolescents with Down syndrome (DS) ages 10 to 21 years completed a battery of language and phonological memory measures twice, 2 years apart. Individual differences were highly stable across two years. Receptive vocabulary scores improved, there was no change in receptive or expressive grammar scores, and nonword repetition scores declined. Digit memory and expressive vocabulary scores improved among younger adolescents, but generally held steady among older adolescents. These patterns may reveal key points in development at which interventions may be best applied. Further research is needed to understand specific processes in tasks that appear to be slowing or declining during adolescence. They may be important for understanding early aging and dementia in DS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)103-118
Number of pages16
JournalAmerican Journal on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Volume123
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • Down syndrome
  • Language
  • Longitudinal
  • Phonological memory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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