Granulocytic ehrlichiosis and tick infestation in mountain lions in California

Janet E Foley, Patrick Foley, Marjon Jecker, Pamela K. Swift, John E Madigan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Forty-seven mountain lions (Puma concolor) collected year-round in 1996 to 1998 from the Sierra Nevada foothills, the northern coast ranges, and in Monterey County (California, USA) were examined for infestation with Ixodes pacificus and Dermacentor variabilis ticks. Ticks were found predominantly in winter and spring. The seroprevalence of granulocytic ehrlichiae (GE) antibodies (Ehrlichia equi or the agent of human granulocytic ehrlichiosis) was 17% and the PCR-prevalence of DNA characteristic of GE in blood was 16%. There were eight polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-positive but seronegative mountain lions, one that was PCR-positive and seropositive, and eight that were PCR-negative and seropositive. Nineteen percent of engorged tick pools from mountain lions were PCR-positive. Because mountain lions inhabit tick-infested habitat and are frequently bitten by I. pacificus, surveillance for GE antibodies and DNA in mountain lions and other vertebrate hosts may be useful as indicators for geographical regions in which humans are at risk of GE infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)703-709
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Wildlife Diseases
Volume35
Issue number4
StatePublished - Oct 1999

Fingerprint

granulocytic ehrlichiosis
Puma
Tick Infestations
Ehrlichiosis
tick infestations
Puma concolor
tick
Ehrlichia
polymerase chain reaction
Ticks
mountain
ticks
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Ixodes pacificus
Anaplasma phagocytophilum
antibody
DNA
Dermacentor
geographical region
Dermacentor variabilis

Keywords

  • Disease ecology
  • Ehrlichia equi
  • Granulocytic ehrlichiae
  • Ixodes pacificus
  • Mountain lion
  • Puma concolor
  • Survey

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Granulocytic ehrlichiosis and tick infestation in mountain lions in California. / Foley, Janet E; Foley, Patrick; Jecker, Marjon; Swift, Pamela K.; Madigan, John E.

In: Journal of Wildlife Diseases, Vol. 35, No. 4, 10.1999, p. 703-709.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Foley, Janet E ; Foley, Patrick ; Jecker, Marjon ; Swift, Pamela K. ; Madigan, John E. / Granulocytic ehrlichiosis and tick infestation in mountain lions in California. In: Journal of Wildlife Diseases. 1999 ; Vol. 35, No. 4. pp. 703-709.
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