Government relations, government regulations

Jumping through the hoops

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Over the last decade, telehealth in Australia has been primarily facilitated and driven by government funding. The government now has a major policy initiative in online health. However, in pursuing the broad initiative there is a danger that some of the smaller components can get lost, and this is probably what has happened to telehealth. There appear to be a number of steps required if telehealth in Australia is to keep up the pace of development that occurred in the 1990s, as we move into what is now being called the era of e-health, involving broadband Internet health service delivery. This area is changing extremely rapidly and is increasingly migrating away from the public sector in Australia, where most of the developmental work has occurred, and into the private sector. Many of the issues that require consideration within the domain of e-health in Australia are also relevant to other countries. E-health will significantly change the way that health-care is practised in future, and it is clear that it is the human factors that are more difficult to overcome, rather than the technological ones.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)83-85
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Telemedicine and Telecare
Volume8
Issue numberSUPPL.3
StatePublished - 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Government Regulation
Telemedicine
Health
Private Sector
Public Sector
Internet
Health Services
Delivery of Health Care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Nursing(all)
  • Health Informatics

Cite this

Government relations, government regulations : Jumping through the hoops. / Yellowlees, Peter Mackinlay.

In: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Vol. 8, No. SUPPL.3, 2002, p. 83-85.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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