Gonadectomy effects on the risk of immune disorders in the dog: A retrospective study

Crystal R. Sundburg, Janelle M. Belanger, Danika L Bannasch, Thomas R. Famula, Anita M. Oberbauer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Gonadectomy is one of the most common procedures performed on dogs in the United States. Neutering has been shown to reduce the risk for some diseases although recent reports suggest increased prevalence for structural disorders and some neoplasias. The relation between neuter status and autoimmune diseases has not been explored. This study evaluated the prevalence and risk of atopic dermatitis (ATOP), autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA), canine myasthenia gravis (CMG), colitis (COL), hypoadrenocorticism (ADD), hypothyroidism (HYPO), immune-mediated polyarthritis (IMPA), immune-mediated thrombocytopenia (ITP), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), lupus erythematosus (LUP), and pemphigus complex (PEMC), for intact females, intact males, neutered females, and neutered males. Pyometra (PYO) was evaluated as a control condition. Results: Patient records (90,090) from the William R. Pritchard Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital at the University of California, Davis from 1995 to 2010 were analyzed in order to determine the risk of immune-mediated disease relative to neuter status in dogs. Neutered dogs had a significantly greater risk of ATOP, AIHA, ADD, HYPO, ITP, and IBD than intact dogs with neutered females being at greater risk than neutered males for all but AIHA and ADD. Neutered females, but not males, had a significantly greater risk of LUP than intact females. Pyometra was a greater risk for intact females. Conclusions: The data underscore the importance of sex steroids on immune function emphasizing a role of these hormones on tissue self-recognition. Neutering is critically important for population control, reduction of reproductive disorders, and offers convenience for owners. Despite these advantages, the analyses of the present study suggest that neutering is associated with increased risk for certain autoimmune disorders and underscore the need for owners to consult with their veterinary practitioner prior to neutering to evaluate possible benefits and risks associated with such a procedure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number278
JournalBMC Veterinary Research
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 8 2016

Fingerprint

Immune System Diseases
retrospective studies
Retrospective Studies
Dogs
dogs
Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia
castration
hemolytic anemia
Pyometra
Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura
lupus erythematosus
pyometra
atopic dermatitis
hypothyroidism
Atopic Dermatitis
Hypothyroidism
inflammatory bowel disease
thrombocytopenia
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
pemphigus (skin disease)

Keywords

  • Dog
  • Gonadectomy
  • Immune function
  • Neuter

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Gonadectomy effects on the risk of immune disorders in the dog : A retrospective study. / Sundburg, Crystal R.; Belanger, Janelle M.; Bannasch, Danika L; Famula, Thomas R.; Oberbauer, Anita M.

In: BMC Veterinary Research, Vol. 12, No. 1, 278, 08.12.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sundburg, Crystal R. ; Belanger, Janelle M. ; Bannasch, Danika L ; Famula, Thomas R. ; Oberbauer, Anita M. / Gonadectomy effects on the risk of immune disorders in the dog : A retrospective study. In: BMC Veterinary Research. 2016 ; Vol. 12, No. 1.
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