Glycosyltransferase engineering for carbohydrate synthesis

John B. McArthur, Xi Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Glycosyltransferases (GTs) are powerful tools for the synthesis of complex and biologically-important carbohydrates. Wild-type GTs may not have all the properties and functions that are desired for largescale production of carbohydrates that exist in nature and those with non-natural modifications. With the increasing availability of crystal structures of GTs, especially those in the presence of donor and acceptor analogues, crystal structure-guided rational design has been quite successful in obtaining mutants with desired functionalities. With current limited understanding of the structure-activity relationship of GTs, directed evolution continues to be a useful approach for generating additional mutants with functionality that can be screened for in a high-throughput format. Mutating the amino acid residues constituting or close to the substrate-binding sites of GTs by structure-guided directed evolution (SGDE) further explores the biotechnological potential of GTs that can only be realized through enzyme engineering. This mini-review discusses the progress made towards GT engineering and the lessons learned for future engineering efforts and assay development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)129-142
Number of pages14
JournalBiochemical Society Transactions
Volume44
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 15 2016

Fingerprint

Glycosyltransferases
Carbohydrates
Crystal structure
Structure-Activity Relationship
Assays
Binding Sites
Throughput
Availability
Amino Acids
Substrates
Enzymes

Keywords

  • Carbohydrate
  • Directed evolution
  • Enzymatic synthesis
  • Glycosyltransferase
  • Mutagenesis
  • Protein engineering

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry

Cite this

Glycosyltransferase engineering for carbohydrate synthesis. / McArthur, John B.; Chen, Xi.

In: Biochemical Society Transactions, Vol. 44, 15.02.2016, p. 129-142.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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