Glucose and lactate kinetics during a short exercise bout in pregnancy

R. M. Cowett, M. W. Carpenter, S. Carr, S. Kalhan, C. Maguire, M. Sady, B. Haydon, S. Sady, B. Dorcus

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Pregnancy is considered diabetogenic. Although exercise has been advocated to assist in metabolic control of the nonpregnant diabetic individual, there is a paucity of data about the metabolic effects of exercise during pregnancy. To examine whether moderate exertion may be beneficial in the maintenance of maternal carbohydrate homeostasis, glucose and lactate kinetics were measured in the third trimester in five pregnant nondiabetic women (gestational age, 34.2 ± 0.1 weeks [mean ± SE]) by infusion of 45 μg · kg-1 · min-1 [6,6-2H2]glucose and 70 μg · kg-1 · min-1 [U- 13C]lactate tracers. Subjects were observed at rest for determination of baseline steady-state kinetics over a 30-minute period, and then they exercised for 30 minutes at 60% maximum oxygen consumption (V̇O2max) and were evaluated for 30 minutes postexercise. Glucose and lactate kinetics and lactate oxidation were measured throughout the exercise protocol. This study was repeated postpartum in all individuals at least 6 weeks after delivery. Compared with the steady-state preinfusion period, plasma glucose concentration was not elevated during exercise in either group, nor was plasma lactate concentration significantly different in either group. Glucose kinetics did not change during exercise, but lactate kinetics increased in both groups. V̇O2 and percent of lactate C contribution to CO2, an indication of lactate oxidation, increased proportionally in both groups during exercise. Metabolic perturbations, as measured by glucose and lactate kinetics, do not appear to be different during the third trimester of pregnancy during a relatively short bout of exercise compared with the nonpregnant state.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)753-758
Number of pages6
JournalMetabolism: Clinical and Experimental
Volume45
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1996
Externally publishedYes

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Lactic Acid
Exercise
Glucose
Pregnancy
Third Pregnancy Trimester
Oxygen Consumption
Postpartum Period
Gestational Age
Pregnant Women
Homeostasis
Maintenance
Mothers
Carbohydrates

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Cowett, R. M., Carpenter, M. W., Carr, S., Kalhan, S., Maguire, C., Sady, M., ... Dorcus, B. (1996). Glucose and lactate kinetics during a short exercise bout in pregnancy. Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, 45(6), 753-758. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0026-0495(96)90142-0

Glucose and lactate kinetics during a short exercise bout in pregnancy. / Cowett, R. M.; Carpenter, M. W.; Carr, S.; Kalhan, S.; Maguire, C.; Sady, M.; Haydon, B.; Sady, S.; Dorcus, B.

In: Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, Vol. 45, No. 6, 1996, p. 753-758.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cowett, RM, Carpenter, MW, Carr, S, Kalhan, S, Maguire, C, Sady, M, Haydon, B, Sady, S & Dorcus, B 1996, 'Glucose and lactate kinetics during a short exercise bout in pregnancy', Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, vol. 45, no. 6, pp. 753-758. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0026-0495(96)90142-0
Cowett, R. M. ; Carpenter, M. W. ; Carr, S. ; Kalhan, S. ; Maguire, C. ; Sady, M. ; Haydon, B. ; Sady, S. ; Dorcus, B. / Glucose and lactate kinetics during a short exercise bout in pregnancy. In: Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental. 1996 ; Vol. 45, No. 6. pp. 753-758.
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