Geographic and racial-ethnic differences in satisfaction with and perceived benefits of mental health services

Giyeon Kim, Jason M. Parton, Katy Lauren Ford, Ami N. Bryant, Ruth Shim, Patricia Parmelee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: This study examined whether racial-ethnic differences in satisfaction with and perceived benefits from mental health services vary by geographic region among U.S. adults. Methods: Drawn from the Collaborative Psychiatric Epidemiology Surveys (CPES), selected samples consisted of 2,160 adults age 18 and older from diverse racial-ethnic groups (Asian, black, Hispanic/Latino, and white) who had used mental health services in the past 12 months. Generalized linear model analysis was conducted for the United States as a whole and separately by geographic region (Northeast, South, Midwest, and West) after adjustment for covariates. Results: In the national sample, no significant main effects of race-ethnicity and geographic region were found in either satisfaction with or perceived benefits from mental health services. In the stratified analyses for geographic regions, however, significant racial-ethnic differences were observed in the West; blacks in the West were significantly more likely to report higher satisfaction and perceived benefits, whereas Hispanics/Latinos in the West were significantly less likely to do so. Conclusions: The findings suggest that there are regional variations of racial-ethnic differences in satisfaction with and perceived benefits from mental health services among U.S. adults and that addressing needs of Hispanics/Latinos in the West may help reduce racial-ethnic disparities in mental health care. Clinical and policy implications are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1474-1482
Number of pages9
JournalPsychiatric Services
Volume65
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Medicine(all)

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