Geoepidemiology of Primary Biliary Cholangitis: Lessons from Switzerland

Benedetta Terziroli Beretta-Piccoli, Guido Stirnimann, Andreas Cerny, David Semela, Roxane Hessler, Beat Helbling, Felix Stickel, Carolina Kalid-de Bakker, Florian Bihl, Emiliano Giostra, Magdalena Filipowicz Sinnreich, Carl Oneta, Adriana Baserga, Pietro Invernizzi, Marco Carbone, Joachim Mertens

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

No data on primary biliary cholangitis (PBC) are available in Switzerland. We established a national patient cohort to obtain information on PBC phenotypes and disease course in Switzerland. Local databases in all university hospitals and in two large secondary centers were searched for case finding. In addition, all primary care physicians, gastroenterologists, rheumatologists, and dermatologists were invited to contribute patients from their own medical records. PBC diagnosis was centrally reviewed. Five hundred one PBC patients were identified, 474 were included in data analysis, and 449 of them were enrolled by tertiary centers. The catchment area accounts for approximately one third of the Swiss population or approximately 2.8 million inhabitants. The median age at diagnosis was 53 years, 84% were women, and 86% were anti-mitochondrial antibody positive. The median follow-up was 5.4 years, 12.6% experienced a liver-related endpoint. Splenomegaly was present at diagnosis in one quarter of patients and in half of male patients. Approximately one third were non-responders to ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA). The median transplant-free survival at 10 years was 85%. The following variables were independently associated with poor outcome: low platelet count at baseline (HR = 0.99, p < 0.0001), elevated alkaline phosphatase at baseline (HR = 1.36, p < 0.0001), elevated bilirubin at baseline (HR = 1.11, p = 0.001), and elevated alanine aminotransaminase (HR = 1.35, p = 0.04) after 12 months of UDCA therapy. The AUROC for the UK-PBC risk score at 5, 10, and 15 years was 0.82. The AUROC for the Globe score at 5, 10, and 15 years was 0.77. Patients included in this study are currently being enrolled in a prospective nationwide registry with biobank, taking advantage of the collaboration network generated by this study. Our study provides the first snapshot of PBC in Switzerland, describing a diagnostic delay with one quarter of patients diagnosed when already in the cirrhotic stage. We were also able to externally validate the UK-PBC risk score and the Globe score. The ongoing nationwide prospective registry will be fundamental to improve disease awareness and interdisciplinary collaborations and will serve as a platform for clinical and translational research. Trial registration number: clinicaltrials.gov: NCT02846896; SNCTP000001870

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-12
Number of pages12
JournalClinical Reviews in Allergy and Immunology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Nov 27 2017
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cholangitis
Switzerland
Ursodeoxycholic Acid
Registries
Translational Medical Research
Splenomegaly
Primary Care Physicians
Platelet Count
Bilirubin
Alanine
Medical Records
Alkaline Phosphatase
Anti-Idiotypic Antibodies
Databases
Transplants
Phenotype
Survival
Liver
Population

Keywords

  • Cohort study
  • Globe score
  • Primary biliary cholangitis
  • Prospective registry
  • Switzerland
  • UK-PBC risk score

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

Terziroli Beretta-Piccoli, B., Stirnimann, G., Cerny, A., Semela, D., Hessler, R., Helbling, B., ... Mertens, J. (Accepted/In press). Geoepidemiology of Primary Biliary Cholangitis: Lessons from Switzerland. Clinical Reviews in Allergy and Immunology, 1-12. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12016-017-8656-x

Geoepidemiology of Primary Biliary Cholangitis : Lessons from Switzerland. / Terziroli Beretta-Piccoli, Benedetta; Stirnimann, Guido; Cerny, Andreas; Semela, David; Hessler, Roxane; Helbling, Beat; Stickel, Felix; Kalid-de Bakker, Carolina; Bihl, Florian; Giostra, Emiliano; Filipowicz Sinnreich, Magdalena; Oneta, Carl; Baserga, Adriana; Invernizzi, Pietro; Carbone, Marco; Mertens, Joachim.

In: Clinical Reviews in Allergy and Immunology, 27.11.2017, p. 1-12.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Terziroli Beretta-Piccoli, B, Stirnimann, G, Cerny, A, Semela, D, Hessler, R, Helbling, B, Stickel, F, Kalid-de Bakker, C, Bihl, F, Giostra, E, Filipowicz Sinnreich, M, Oneta, C, Baserga, A, Invernizzi, P, Carbone, M & Mertens, J 2017, 'Geoepidemiology of Primary Biliary Cholangitis: Lessons from Switzerland', Clinical Reviews in Allergy and Immunology, pp. 1-12. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12016-017-8656-x
Terziroli Beretta-Piccoli B, Stirnimann G, Cerny A, Semela D, Hessler R, Helbling B et al. Geoepidemiology of Primary Biliary Cholangitis: Lessons from Switzerland. Clinical Reviews in Allergy and Immunology. 2017 Nov 27;1-12. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12016-017-8656-x
Terziroli Beretta-Piccoli, Benedetta ; Stirnimann, Guido ; Cerny, Andreas ; Semela, David ; Hessler, Roxane ; Helbling, Beat ; Stickel, Felix ; Kalid-de Bakker, Carolina ; Bihl, Florian ; Giostra, Emiliano ; Filipowicz Sinnreich, Magdalena ; Oneta, Carl ; Baserga, Adriana ; Invernizzi, Pietro ; Carbone, Marco ; Mertens, Joachim. / Geoepidemiology of Primary Biliary Cholangitis : Lessons from Switzerland. In: Clinical Reviews in Allergy and Immunology. 2017 ; pp. 1-12.
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AU - Cerny, Andreas

AU - Semela, David

AU - Hessler, Roxane

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AU - Stickel, Felix

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