Genome sequences of three koi herpesvirus isolates representing the expanding distribution of an emerging disease threatening koi and common carp worldwide

Takashi Aoki, Ikuo Hirono, Ken Kurokawa, Hideo Fukuda, Ronen Nahary, Avi Eldar, Andrew J. Davison, Thomas B. Waltzek, Herve Bercovier, Ronald Hedrick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

180 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Since the mid-1990s, lethal infections of koi herpesvirus (KHV) have been spreading, threatening the worldwide production of common carp and koi (both Cyprinus carpio). The complete genome sequences of three KHV strains from Japan, the United States, and Israel revealed a 295-kbp genome containing a 22-kbp terminal direct repeat. The finding that 15 KHV genes have clear homologs in the distantly related channel catfish virus (ictalurid herpesvirus 1) confirms the proposed place of KHV in the family Herpesviridae, specifically in the branch with fish and amphibian hosts. KHV thus has the largest genome reported to date for this family. The three strains were interpreted as having arisen from a wild-type parent encoding 156 unique protein-coding genes, 8 of which are duplicated in the terminal repeat. In each strain, four to seven genes from among a set of nine are fragmented by frameshifts likely to render the encoded proteins nonfunctional. Six of the affected genes encode predicted membrane glycoproteins. Frameshifts or other mutations close to the 3′ ends of coding sequences were identified in a further six genes. The conclusion that at least some of these mutations occurred in vivo prompts the hypothesis that loss of gene functions might be associated with emergence of the disease and provides a basis for further investigations into the molecular epidemiology of the virus.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5058-5065
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Virology
Volume81
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2007

Fingerprint

Cyprinid herpesvirus 3
koi
Carps
emerging diseases
Herpesviridae
Cyprinus carpio
Ictalurivirus
Genome
genome
Ictalurid herpesvirus 1
Terminal Repeat Sequences
Genes
genes
Herpesviridae Infections
Mutation
Molecular Epidemiology
membrane glycoproteins
Nucleic Acid Repetitive Sequences
Membrane Glycoproteins
mutation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Genome sequences of three koi herpesvirus isolates representing the expanding distribution of an emerging disease threatening koi and common carp worldwide. / Aoki, Takashi; Hirono, Ikuo; Kurokawa, Ken; Fukuda, Hideo; Nahary, Ronen; Eldar, Avi; Davison, Andrew J.; Waltzek, Thomas B.; Bercovier, Herve; Hedrick, Ronald.

In: Journal of Virology, Vol. 81, No. 10, 01.05.2007, p. 5058-5065.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Aoki, Takashi ; Hirono, Ikuo ; Kurokawa, Ken ; Fukuda, Hideo ; Nahary, Ronen ; Eldar, Avi ; Davison, Andrew J. ; Waltzek, Thomas B. ; Bercovier, Herve ; Hedrick, Ronald. / Genome sequences of three koi herpesvirus isolates representing the expanding distribution of an emerging disease threatening koi and common carp worldwide. In: Journal of Virology. 2007 ; Vol. 81, No. 10. pp. 5058-5065.
@article{0d3b0fcb449749c18a8d65463267d32b,
title = "Genome sequences of three koi herpesvirus isolates representing the expanding distribution of an emerging disease threatening koi and common carp worldwide",
abstract = "Since the mid-1990s, lethal infections of koi herpesvirus (KHV) have been spreading, threatening the worldwide production of common carp and koi (both Cyprinus carpio). The complete genome sequences of three KHV strains from Japan, the United States, and Israel revealed a 295-kbp genome containing a 22-kbp terminal direct repeat. The finding that 15 KHV genes have clear homologs in the distantly related channel catfish virus (ictalurid herpesvirus 1) confirms the proposed place of KHV in the family Herpesviridae, specifically in the branch with fish and amphibian hosts. KHV thus has the largest genome reported to date for this family. The three strains were interpreted as having arisen from a wild-type parent encoding 156 unique protein-coding genes, 8 of which are duplicated in the terminal repeat. In each strain, four to seven genes from among a set of nine are fragmented by frameshifts likely to render the encoded proteins nonfunctional. Six of the affected genes encode predicted membrane glycoproteins. Frameshifts or other mutations close to the 3′ ends of coding sequences were identified in a further six genes. The conclusion that at least some of these mutations occurred in vivo prompts the hypothesis that loss of gene functions might be associated with emergence of the disease and provides a basis for further investigations into the molecular epidemiology of the virus.",
author = "Takashi Aoki and Ikuo Hirono and Ken Kurokawa and Hideo Fukuda and Ronen Nahary and Avi Eldar and Davison, {Andrew J.} and Waltzek, {Thomas B.} and Herve Bercovier and Ronald Hedrick",
year = "2007",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1128/JVI.00146-07",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "81",
pages = "5058--5065",
journal = "Journal of Virology",
issn = "0022-538X",
publisher = "American Society for Microbiology",
number = "10",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Genome sequences of three koi herpesvirus isolates representing the expanding distribution of an emerging disease threatening koi and common carp worldwide

AU - Aoki, Takashi

AU - Hirono, Ikuo

AU - Kurokawa, Ken

AU - Fukuda, Hideo

AU - Nahary, Ronen

AU - Eldar, Avi

AU - Davison, Andrew J.

AU - Waltzek, Thomas B.

AU - Bercovier, Herve

AU - Hedrick, Ronald

PY - 2007/5/1

Y1 - 2007/5/1

N2 - Since the mid-1990s, lethal infections of koi herpesvirus (KHV) have been spreading, threatening the worldwide production of common carp and koi (both Cyprinus carpio). The complete genome sequences of three KHV strains from Japan, the United States, and Israel revealed a 295-kbp genome containing a 22-kbp terminal direct repeat. The finding that 15 KHV genes have clear homologs in the distantly related channel catfish virus (ictalurid herpesvirus 1) confirms the proposed place of KHV in the family Herpesviridae, specifically in the branch with fish and amphibian hosts. KHV thus has the largest genome reported to date for this family. The three strains were interpreted as having arisen from a wild-type parent encoding 156 unique protein-coding genes, 8 of which are duplicated in the terminal repeat. In each strain, four to seven genes from among a set of nine are fragmented by frameshifts likely to render the encoded proteins nonfunctional. Six of the affected genes encode predicted membrane glycoproteins. Frameshifts or other mutations close to the 3′ ends of coding sequences were identified in a further six genes. The conclusion that at least some of these mutations occurred in vivo prompts the hypothesis that loss of gene functions might be associated with emergence of the disease and provides a basis for further investigations into the molecular epidemiology of the virus.

AB - Since the mid-1990s, lethal infections of koi herpesvirus (KHV) have been spreading, threatening the worldwide production of common carp and koi (both Cyprinus carpio). The complete genome sequences of three KHV strains from Japan, the United States, and Israel revealed a 295-kbp genome containing a 22-kbp terminal direct repeat. The finding that 15 KHV genes have clear homologs in the distantly related channel catfish virus (ictalurid herpesvirus 1) confirms the proposed place of KHV in the family Herpesviridae, specifically in the branch with fish and amphibian hosts. KHV thus has the largest genome reported to date for this family. The three strains were interpreted as having arisen from a wild-type parent encoding 156 unique protein-coding genes, 8 of which are duplicated in the terminal repeat. In each strain, four to seven genes from among a set of nine are fragmented by frameshifts likely to render the encoded proteins nonfunctional. Six of the affected genes encode predicted membrane glycoproteins. Frameshifts or other mutations close to the 3′ ends of coding sequences were identified in a further six genes. The conclusion that at least some of these mutations occurred in vivo prompts the hypothesis that loss of gene functions might be associated with emergence of the disease and provides a basis for further investigations into the molecular epidemiology of the virus.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=34248346700&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=34248346700&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1128/JVI.00146-07

DO - 10.1128/JVI.00146-07

M3 - Article

C2 - 17329333

AN - SCOPUS:34248346700

VL - 81

SP - 5058

EP - 5065

JO - Journal of Virology

JF - Journal of Virology

SN - 0022-538X

IS - 10

ER -