Genetic differentiation of Anopheles gambiae s.s. populations in Mali, West Africa, using microsatellite loci

J. Carnahan, L. Zheng, Charles E. Taylor, Y. T. Touré, D. E. Norris, G. Dolo, M. Diuk-Wasser, Gregory C Lanzaro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto is a principal vector of malaria through much of sub-Saharan Africa, where this disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in human populations. Accordingly, population sizes and gene flow in this species have received special attention, as these parameters are important in attempts to control malaria by impacting its mosquito vector. Past measures of genetic differentiation have sometimes yielded conflicting results, in some cases suggesting that gene flow is extensive over vast distances (6000 km) and is disrupted only by major geological disturbances and/or barriers. Using microsatellite DNA loci from populations in Mali, West Africa, we measured genetic differentiation over uniform habitats favorable to the species across distances ranging from 62 to 536 km. Gene flow was strongly correlated with distance (r2 = 0.77), with no major differences among chromosomes. We conclude that in this part of Africa, at least, genetic differentiation for microsatellite DNA loci is consistent with traditional models of isolation by distance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)249-253
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Heredity
Volume93
Issue number4
StatePublished - Jul 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Mali
Anopheles gambiae
Western Africa
Gene Flow
Microsatellite Repeats
gene flow
microsatellite repeats
malaria
genetic variation
loci
Malaria
Population
Africa South of the Sahara
DNA
Sub-Saharan Africa
Population Density
human population
Ecosystem
morbidity
Culicidae

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Genetics
  • Genetics(clinical)

Cite this

Carnahan, J., Zheng, L., Taylor, C. E., Touré, Y. T., Norris, D. E., Dolo, G., ... Lanzaro, G. C. (2002). Genetic differentiation of Anopheles gambiae s.s. populations in Mali, West Africa, using microsatellite loci. Journal of Heredity, 93(4), 249-253.

Genetic differentiation of Anopheles gambiae s.s. populations in Mali, West Africa, using microsatellite loci. / Carnahan, J.; Zheng, L.; Taylor, Charles E.; Touré, Y. T.; Norris, D. E.; Dolo, G.; Diuk-Wasser, M.; Lanzaro, Gregory C.

In: Journal of Heredity, Vol. 93, No. 4, 07.2002, p. 249-253.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Carnahan, J, Zheng, L, Taylor, CE, Touré, YT, Norris, DE, Dolo, G, Diuk-Wasser, M & Lanzaro, GC 2002, 'Genetic differentiation of Anopheles gambiae s.s. populations in Mali, West Africa, using microsatellite loci', Journal of Heredity, vol. 93, no. 4, pp. 249-253.
Carnahan J, Zheng L, Taylor CE, Touré YT, Norris DE, Dolo G et al. Genetic differentiation of Anopheles gambiae s.s. populations in Mali, West Africa, using microsatellite loci. Journal of Heredity. 2002 Jul;93(4):249-253.
Carnahan, J. ; Zheng, L. ; Taylor, Charles E. ; Touré, Y. T. ; Norris, D. E. ; Dolo, G. ; Diuk-Wasser, M. ; Lanzaro, Gregory C. / Genetic differentiation of Anopheles gambiae s.s. populations in Mali, West Africa, using microsatellite loci. In: Journal of Heredity. 2002 ; Vol. 93, No. 4. pp. 249-253.
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