Genetic determinants of Venezuelan equine encephalitis emergence.

S. C. Weaver, M. Anishchenko, R. Bowen, Aaron Brault, J. G. Estrada-Franco, Z. Fernandez, I. Greene, D. Ortiz, S. Paessler, A. M. Powers

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Following a period of inactivity from 1973-1991, Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) reemerged during the past decade in South America and Mexico. Experimental studies of VEE virus (VEEV) infection of horses with virus strains isolated during these outbreaks have revealed considerable variation in the ability of equine-virulent, epizootic strains to exploit horses as efficient amplification hosts. Subtype IC strains from recent outbreaks in Venezuela and Colombia amplify efficiently in equines, with a correlation between maximum viremia titers and the extent of the outbreak from which the virus strain was isolated. Studies of enzootic VEEV strains that are believed to represent progenitors of the epizootic subtypes support the hypothesis that adaptation to efficient replication in equines is a major determinant of emergence and the ability of VEEV to spread geographically. Correlations between the ability of enzootic and epizootic VEEV strains to infect abundant, equiphilic mosquitoes, and the location and extent of these outbreaks, also suggest that specific adaptation to Ochlerotatus taeniorhynchus mosquitoes is a determinant of some but not all emergence events. Genetic studies imply that mutations in the E2 envelope glycoprotein gene are major determinants of adaptation to both equines and mosquito vectors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)43-64
Number of pages22
JournalArchives of virology. Supplementum
Issue number18
StatePublished - Jul 5 2004
Externally publishedYes

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Venezuelan Equine Encephalomyelitides
Disease Outbreaks
Viruses
Horses
Culicidae
Ochlerotatus
Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Viruses
Venezuela
Colombia
South America
Viremia
Virus Diseases
Mexico
Glycoproteins
Mutation
Genes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)

Cite this

Weaver, S. C., Anishchenko, M., Bowen, R., Brault, A., Estrada-Franco, J. G., Fernandez, Z., ... Powers, A. M. (2004). Genetic determinants of Venezuelan equine encephalitis emergence. Archives of virology. Supplementum, (18), 43-64.

Genetic determinants of Venezuelan equine encephalitis emergence. / Weaver, S. C.; Anishchenko, M.; Bowen, R.; Brault, Aaron; Estrada-Franco, J. G.; Fernandez, Z.; Greene, I.; Ortiz, D.; Paessler, S.; Powers, A. M.

In: Archives of virology. Supplementum, No. 18, 05.07.2004, p. 43-64.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Weaver, SC, Anishchenko, M, Bowen, R, Brault, A, Estrada-Franco, JG, Fernandez, Z, Greene, I, Ortiz, D, Paessler, S & Powers, AM 2004, 'Genetic determinants of Venezuelan equine encephalitis emergence.', Archives of virology. Supplementum, no. 18, pp. 43-64.
Weaver SC, Anishchenko M, Bowen R, Brault A, Estrada-Franco JG, Fernandez Z et al. Genetic determinants of Venezuelan equine encephalitis emergence. Archives of virology. Supplementum. 2004 Jul 5;(18):43-64.
Weaver, S. C. ; Anishchenko, M. ; Bowen, R. ; Brault, Aaron ; Estrada-Franco, J. G. ; Fernandez, Z. ; Greene, I. ; Ortiz, D. ; Paessler, S. ; Powers, A. M. / Genetic determinants of Venezuelan equine encephalitis emergence. In: Archives of virology. Supplementum. 2004 ; No. 18. pp. 43-64.
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