Generators of human spinal somatosensory evoked potentials

Masud Seyal, A. J. Gabor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Somatosensory evoked potentials recorded over the spine with a noncephalic reference following posterior tibial nerve stimulation have several components. (1) A stationary, synapse-dependent, negative potential (N22) occurs synchronously with a positive potential, P22, recorded ventral to the spinal cord and is localized to the region overlying the lumbar root entry zone. The N22/P22 complex is attributed to activation of interneurons in the dorsal gray of the lumbar cord. (2) A traveling negative potential with a gradually increasing latency may be recorded from the sacral to the cervical region. Its short refractory period indicates that it is not dependent on transmission across a synapse. This activity is attributed to transmission of the afferent volley through the lumbosacral plexus, roots, and the dorsal columns of the spinal cord. (3) N29, a stationary, synapse-dependent negative potential, localizes to the rostral cervical spine and is attributed to activation of the gracile nucleus relay cells. Following stimulation of the median nerve of fingers, the waveforms recorded over the cervical spine with a noncephalic reference include (1) the proximal plexus volley, a traveling negative potential reflecting transmission through the proximal brachial plexus and roots; (2) the dorsal column volley (DCV), the latency of which gradually increases from the caudal to rostral cervical region (the DCV is attributed to transmission of the afferent volley through the dorsal columns of the cervical cord); and (3) N13, a stationary negative waveform, with a long refractory period consistent with its dependence on transmission across a synapse. Experimental animal and human studies indicate that the N13 waveform is dependent on activity of at least two generator sites, namely the dorsal gray of the cervical cord and the cuneate nucleus.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)177-187
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Clinical Neurophysiology
Volume4
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1987

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Somatosensory Evoked Potentials
Synapses
Spinal Cord
Spine
Lumbosacral Plexus
Lumbosacral Region
Tibial Nerve
Brachial Plexus
Spinal Nerve Roots
Median Nerve
Interneurons
Cell Nucleus
Fingers
Cervical Cord

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Generators of human spinal somatosensory evoked potentials. / Seyal, Masud; Gabor, A. J.

In: Journal of Clinical Neurophysiology, Vol. 4, No. 2, 1987, p. 177-187.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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