General-medical hospital admissions from a public inpatient psychiatric health facility: A review of medical complications over 30 months

Margaret W. Leung, Glen Xiong, Martin H Leamon, Robert M. Mccarron, Robert E Hales

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Medical comorbidity and mortality disproportionately affect adults with serious mental illness, as compared with the general population. Objective: This study examined the medical diagnoses of patients transferred from a psychiatric health facility to general-medical hospitals. Method: The authors retrospectively reviewed the charts of 81 adult patients admitted to an inpatient psychiatric facility who were subsequently transferred to local general-medical hospitals from January 2005 to June 2007. Results: Of 6,688 separate inpatient admissions, 81 patients (2.1%) were admitted to general-medical hospitals a total of 93 times, and had 108 admitting medical diagnoses. The leading admission indications were infections (N=33; 34%), electrolyte or nutritional abnormalities (N=12; 11%), and cardiovascular disorders (N=12; 11%). Iatrogenic causes related to psychiatric medications accounted for a small proportion of medical admissions (N=8; 7.5%). Over 90% of the patients had chronic medical disorders, and 80% of the patients had a psychotic or bipolar disorder. Conclusion: Patients with severe mental illness and chronic medical disorders may experience significant acute medical complications during inpatient psychiatric treatment. Given the complex care issues involved, continued vigilance in treating or preventing these conditions is warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)498-502
Number of pages5
JournalPsychosomatics
Volume51
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2010

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Applied Psychology

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