Gemcitabine causes minimal modulation of carboplatin-DNA monoadduct formation and repair in bladder cancer cells

Sisi Wang, Hongyong Zhang, Michael Malfatti, Ralph W deVere White, Primo N Lara, Ken W Turteltaub, Paul Henderson, Chong-Xian Pan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We are developing a method to identify cellular resistance to carboplatin by using accelerator mass spectrometry to measure carboplatin-DNA adducts formed from drug microdoses (∼1/100th the therapeutic dose). Such an approach would be particularly useful if it is still valid in combination chemotherapy. We examined whether the addition of gemcitabine, another chemotherapeutic drug, could influence carboplatin-DNA adduct levels. There were no substantial differences in the levels of carboplatin-DNA adducts in cells upon exposure to the carboplatin/gemcitabine combination at various doses and schedules. These data demonstrate that microdosing is feasible for the characterization of carboplatin resistance when given in combination with gemcitabine.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1653-1655
Number of pages3
JournalChemical Research in Toxicology
Volume23
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 15 2010

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gemcitabine
Carboplatin
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms
Repair
Cells
Modulation
DNA
Chemotherapy
Combination Drug Therapy
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Particle accelerators
Mass spectrometry
Mass Spectrometry
Appointments and Schedules
carboplatin-DNA adduct

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Toxicology

Cite this

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abstract = "We are developing a method to identify cellular resistance to carboplatin by using accelerator mass spectrometry to measure carboplatin-DNA adducts formed from drug microdoses (∼1/100th the therapeutic dose). Such an approach would be particularly useful if it is still valid in combination chemotherapy. We examined whether the addition of gemcitabine, another chemotherapeutic drug, could influence carboplatin-DNA adduct levels. There were no substantial differences in the levels of carboplatin-DNA adducts in cells upon exposure to the carboplatin/gemcitabine combination at various doses and schedules. These data demonstrate that microdosing is feasible for the characterization of carboplatin resistance when given in combination with gemcitabine.",
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T1 - Gemcitabine causes minimal modulation of carboplatin-DNA monoadduct formation and repair in bladder cancer cells

AU - Wang, Sisi

AU - Zhang, Hongyong

AU - Malfatti, Michael

AU - deVere White, Ralph W

AU - Lara, Primo N

AU - Turteltaub, Ken W

AU - Henderson, Paul

AU - Pan, Chong-Xian

PY - 2010/11/15

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AB - We are developing a method to identify cellular resistance to carboplatin by using accelerator mass spectrometry to measure carboplatin-DNA adducts formed from drug microdoses (∼1/100th the therapeutic dose). Such an approach would be particularly useful if it is still valid in combination chemotherapy. We examined whether the addition of gemcitabine, another chemotherapeutic drug, could influence carboplatin-DNA adduct levels. There were no substantial differences in the levels of carboplatin-DNA adducts in cells upon exposure to the carboplatin/gemcitabine combination at various doses and schedules. These data demonstrate that microdosing is feasible for the characterization of carboplatin resistance when given in combination with gemcitabine.

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