Gastrointestinal decontamination in the acutely poisoned patient

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To define the role of gastrointestinal (GI) decontamination of the poisoned patient. Data Sources: A computer-based PubMed/MEDLINE search of the literature on GI decontamination in the poisoned patient with cross referencing of sources. Study Selection and Data Extraction: Clinical, animal and in vitro studies were reviewed for clinical relevance to GI decontamination of the poisoned patient. Data Synthesis: The literature suggests that previously, widely used, aggressive approaches including the use of ipecac syrup, gastric lavage, and cathartics are now rarely recommended. Whole bowel irrigation is still often recommended for slow-release drugs, metals, and patients who "pack" or "stuff" foreign bodies filled with drugs of abuse, but with little quality data to support it. Activated charcoal (AC), single or multiple doses, was also a previous mainstay of GI decontamination, but the utility of AC is now recognized to be limited and more time dependent than previously practiced. These recommen tions have resulted in several treatment guidelines that are mostly based on retrospective analysis, animal studies or small case series, and rarely based on randomized clinical trials. Conclusions: The current literature supports limited use of GI decontamination of the poisoned patient.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number65
JournalInternational Journal of Emergency Medicine
Volume4
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2011

Fingerprint

Decontamination
Charcoal
Ipecac
Gastric Lavage
Cathartics
Information Storage and Retrieval
Street Drugs
Foreign Bodies
PubMed
MEDLINE
Randomized Controlled Trials
Metals
Guidelines

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine

Cite this

Gastrointestinal decontamination in the acutely poisoned patient. / Albertson, Timothy E; Owen, Kelly; Sutter, Mark E; Chan, Andrew.

In: International Journal of Emergency Medicine, Vol. 4, No. 1, 65, 12.2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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