Gastroduodenal ulceration in cats

Eight cases and a review of the literature

J. M. Liptak, Geraldine B Hunt, V. R D Barrs, S. F. Foster, P. L C Tisdall, C. R. O'Brien, R. Malik

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Gastroduodenal ulceration (GU) and blood loss was diagnosed in eight cats and compared with 25 previously reported cases of feline GU. Cats with GU presented in a critical condition. Clinical signs consistent with gastrointestinal bleeding were infrequently identified although anaemia was a common finding. Non-neoplastic causes of feline GU tended to have a shorter clinical course with ulcers confined to the stomach. Conversely, cats with tumour-associated GU usually had a more protracted clinical course, weight loss, and ulcers located in the stomach for gastric tumours and the duodenum for extra-intestinal tumours. In this series, definitive diagnosis was possible for cats with neoplasia (gastric tumours and gastrinoma), however, it was difficult to precisely identify the underlying aetiology in cats with non-neoplastic GU. Prompt stabilisation with a compatible blood transfusion, surgical debridement or resection, antibiotic and antiulcer therapy, and treatment of the underlying disease, if identified, was successful in the majority of cases. The prognosis for cats with appropriately managed GU depended on the underlying aetiology, but even cats with neoplasia could be successfully palliated for prolonged periods.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)27-42
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
Volume4
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002
Externally publishedYes

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Cats
cats
Stomach
stomach neoplasms
Neoplasms
Felidae
neoplasms
Ulcer
disease course
Gastrinoma
etiology
Debridement
debridement
Duodenum
Blood Transfusion
blood transfusion
Anemia
Weight Loss
resection
duodenum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Liptak, J. M., Hunt, G. B., Barrs, V. R. D., Foster, S. F., Tisdall, P. L. C., O'Brien, C. R., & Malik, R. (2002). Gastroduodenal ulceration in cats: Eight cases and a review of the literature. Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, 4(1), 27-42. https://doi.org/10.1053/jfms.2001.0148

Gastroduodenal ulceration in cats : Eight cases and a review of the literature. / Liptak, J. M.; Hunt, Geraldine B; Barrs, V. R D; Foster, S. F.; Tisdall, P. L C; O'Brien, C. R.; Malik, R.

In: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Vol. 4, No. 1, 2002, p. 27-42.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Liptak, JM, Hunt, GB, Barrs, VRD, Foster, SF, Tisdall, PLC, O'Brien, CR & Malik, R 2002, 'Gastroduodenal ulceration in cats: Eight cases and a review of the literature', Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, vol. 4, no. 1, pp. 27-42. https://doi.org/10.1053/jfms.2001.0148
Liptak, J. M. ; Hunt, Geraldine B ; Barrs, V. R D ; Foster, S. F. ; Tisdall, P. L C ; O'Brien, C. R. ; Malik, R. / Gastroduodenal ulceration in cats : Eight cases and a review of the literature. In: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery. 2002 ; Vol. 4, No. 1. pp. 27-42.
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