Gadolinium deposition within the pediatric brain: No increased intrinsic T1-weighted signal intensity within the dentate nucleus following the administration of a minimum of 4 doses of the macrocyclic agent gadoteridol

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Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Our aim was to evaluate whether serial administration of the macrocyclic gadolinium-based contrast agent gadoteridol in children is associated with T1-weighted hyperintensity within the dentate nucleus, an imaging surrogate for gadolinium deposition. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We identified a retrospective cohort of 10 patients younger than 18 years of age who underwent between 4 and 8 gadoteridol-enhanced MR imaging examinations of the brain from 2016 to 2017. For comparison, we identified a retrospective cohort of 9 pediatric patients who each underwent 6 gadodiamide-enhanced MR imaging examinations. For each examination, both dentate nuclei were contoured on unenhanced images and the mean dentate-to-pons signal intensity ratio was calculated. Dentate-to-pons signal intensity ratios from the first and last scans were compared using paired t tests. RESULTS: In the gadoteridol group, there was no significant change in the mean dentate-to-pons signal intensity ratio from the first to the last scan (0.99 versus 0.99, P .59). In the gadodiamide group, there was a significant increase in the mean dentate-to-pons signal intensity ratio from the first to the last scan (0.99 versus 1.10, P .001). CONCLUSIONS: Repeat administration of the macrocyclic gadolinium-based contrast agent gadoteridol in children was not associated with T1-weighted dentate hyperintensity, while the repeat administration of the linear gadolinium-based contrast agent gadodiamide was associated with T1-weighted dentate hyperintensity, presumably due to gadolinium deposition.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1604-1608
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Neuroradiology
Volume39
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2018

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Clinical Neurology

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