G proteins and phototransduction

Vadim Y. Arshavsky, Trevor D. Lamb, Edward N Pugh Jr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

407 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Phototransduction is the process by which a photon of light captured by a molecule of visual pigment generates an electrical response in a photoreceptor cell. Vertebrate rod phototransduction is one of the best-studied G protein signaling pathways. In this pathway the photoreceptor-specific G protein, transducin, mediates between the visual pigment, rhodopsin, and the effector enzyme, cGMP phosphodiesterase. This review focuses on two quantitative features of G protein signaling in phototransduction: signal amplification and response timing. We examine how the interplay between the mechanisms that contribute to amplification and those that govern termination of G protein activity determine the speed and the sensitivity of the cellular response to light.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)153-187
Number of pages35
JournalAnnual Review of Physiology
Volume64
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Light Signal Transduction
GTP-Binding Proteins
Retinal Pigments
Transducin
Light
Photoreceptor Cells
Rhodopsin
Phosphoric Diester Hydrolases
Photons
Vertebrates
Enzymes

Keywords

  • Amplification
  • Phosphodiesterase
  • Signal termination
  • Transducin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology

Cite this

G proteins and phototransduction. / Arshavsky, Vadim Y.; Lamb, Trevor D.; Pugh Jr, Edward N.

In: Annual Review of Physiology, Vol. 64, 2002, p. 153-187.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Arshavsky, Vadim Y. ; Lamb, Trevor D. ; Pugh Jr, Edward N. / G proteins and phototransduction. In: Annual Review of Physiology. 2002 ; Vol. 64. pp. 153-187.
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