FunGene: The functional gene pipeline and repository

Jordan A. Fish, Benli Chai, Qiong Wang, Yanni Sun, Charles Brown, James M. Tiedje, James R. Cole

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

236 Scopus citations

Abstract

Ribosomal RNA genes have become the standard molecular markers for microbial community analysis for good reasons, including universal occurrence in cellular organisms, availability of large databases, and ease of rRNA gene region amplification and analysis. As markers, however, rRNA genes have some significant limitations. The rRNA genes are often present in multiple copies, unlike most protein-coding genes. The slow rate of change in rRNA genes means that multiple species sometimes share identical 16S rRNA gene sequences, while many more species share identical sequences in the short 16S rRNA regions commonly analyzed. In addition, the genes involved in many important processes are not distributed in a phylogenetically coherent manner, potentially due to gene loss or horizontal gene transfer. While rRNA genes remain the most commonly used markers, key genes in ecologically important pathways, e.g., those involved in carbon and nitrogen cycling, can provide important insights into community composition and function not obtainable through rRNA analysis. However, working with ecofunctional gene data requires some tools beyond those required for rRNA analysis. To address this, our Functional Gene Pipeline and Repository (FunGene; http://fungene.cme.msu.edu/) offers databases of many common ecofunctional genes and proteins, as well as integrated tools that allow researchers to browse these collections and choose subsets for further analysis, build phylogenetic trees, test primers and probes for coverage, and download aligned sequences. Additional FunGene tools are specialized to process coding gene amplicon data. For example, FrameBot produces frameshift-corrected protein and DNA sequences from raw reads while finding the most closely related protein reference sequence. These tools can help provide better insight into microbial communities by directly studying key genes involved in important ecological processes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalFrontiers in Microbiology
Volume4
Issue numberOCT
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Amplicon analysis
  • Amplification primers
  • Biogeochemical cycles
  • Functional genes
  • Microbial ecology
  • Phylogeny

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Microbiology (medical)

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    Fish, J. A., Chai, B., Wang, Q., Sun, Y., Brown, C., Tiedje, J. M., & Cole, J. R. (2013). FunGene: The functional gene pipeline and repository. Frontiers in Microbiology, 4(OCT). https://doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2013.00291