Functions of motor proteins in echinoderm embryos: An argument in support of antibody inhibition experiments

Jonathan M. Scholey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Antibody inhibition experiments are proving to be extremely valuable in probing the in vivo functions of actin- and microtubule-based motor proteins in the early development of echinoderm embryos, despite some skepticism among many cell biologists concerning the reliability of this approach. Antibody inhibition has revealed that motor proteins participate in diverse events during early echinoderm development, including mitosis, cytokinesis, the transport of exocytotic vesicles, and the assembly of motile cilia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)257-260
Number of pages4
JournalCell Motility and the Cytoskeleton
Volume39
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1998

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Embryonic Structures
Transport Vesicles
Cytokinesis
Antibodies
Cilia
Mitosis
Microtubules
Embryonic Development
Actins
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Functions of motor proteins in echinoderm embryos : An argument in support of antibody inhibition experiments. / Scholey, Jonathan M.

In: Cell Motility and the Cytoskeleton, Vol. 39, No. 4, 1998, p. 257-260.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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