Functional subregions of the human entorhinal cortex

Anne Maass, David Berron, Laura A. Libby, Charan Ranganath, Emrah Düzel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

66 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The entorhinal cortex (EC) is the primary site of interactions between the neocortex and hippocampus. Studies in rodents and nonhuman primates suggest that EC can be divided into subregions that connect differentially with perirhinal cortex (PRC) vs parahippocampal cortex (PHC) and with hippocampal subfields along the proximo-distal axis. Here, we used high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging at 7 Tesla to identify functional subdivisions of the human EC. In two independent datasets, PRC showed preferential intrinsic functional connectivity with anterior-lateral EC and PHC with posterior-medial EC. These EC subregions, in turn, exhibited differential connectivity with proximal and distal subiculum. In contrast, connectivity of PRC and PHC with subiculum followed not only a proximal-distal but also an anterior-posterior gradient. Our data provide the first evidence that the human EC can be divided into functional subdivisions whose functional connectivity closely parallels the known anatomical connectivity patterns of the rodent and nonhuman primate EC.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere06426
Pages (from-to)1-20
Number of pages20
JournaleLife
Volume4
Issue numberJUNE
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 8 2015

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Entorhinal Cortex
Hippocampus
Primates
Rodentia
Neocortex
Magnetic Resonance Imaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Medicine(all)
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Maass, A., Berron, D., Libby, L. A., Ranganath, C., & Düzel, E. (2015). Functional subregions of the human entorhinal cortex. eLife, 4(JUNE), 1-20. [e06426 ]. https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06426

Functional subregions of the human entorhinal cortex. / Maass, Anne; Berron, David; Libby, Laura A.; Ranganath, Charan; Düzel, Emrah.

In: eLife, Vol. 4, No. JUNE, e06426 , 08.06.2015, p. 1-20.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Maass, A, Berron, D, Libby, LA, Ranganath, C & Düzel, E 2015, 'Functional subregions of the human entorhinal cortex', eLife, vol. 4, no. JUNE, e06426 , pp. 1-20. https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06426
Maass A, Berron D, Libby LA, Ranganath C, Düzel E. Functional subregions of the human entorhinal cortex. eLife. 2015 Jun 8;4(JUNE):1-20. e06426 . https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06426
Maass, Anne ; Berron, David ; Libby, Laura A. ; Ranganath, Charan ; Düzel, Emrah. / Functional subregions of the human entorhinal cortex. In: eLife. 2015 ; Vol. 4, No. JUNE. pp. 1-20.
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