Functional significance of coronary collateral vessels in patients with acute myocardial infarction: Relation to pump performance, cardiogenic shock and survival

David O. Williams, Ezra A Amsterdam, Richard R. Miller, Dean T. Mason

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

122 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In 20 patients with acute myocardial infarction requiring emergency left heart catheterization and coronary arteriography, ventricular function and clinical course were related to collateral vessels supplying the infarcted area. The major coronary artery to the infarcted region was severely obstructed in all patients. Patients with adequate collateral vessels (Group I, no. = 6) and those with no or inadequate collateral channels (Group II, no. = 14) had similar findings with respect to age, site of infarction, prevalence of prior infarction and presence of multivessel disease. However, there were significant differences between Groups I and II in left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (13 versus 30 mm Hg), cardiac index (3.05 versus 2.04 liters/min per m2), stroke work index (45 versus 13 g · m/m2), ejection fraction (42 versus 20 percent) and area of dyssynergy (14 versus 47 percent). Moreover, in Group I all patients survived and none had cardiogenic shock, whereas in Group II 10 of 14 patients had shock and 8 of 14 died. The rapidity of vessel obstruction appeared to influence collateralization since infarction was preceded by angina pectoris more frequently in Group I than in Group II. These results indicate that well functioning anastomotic channels to the distal trunk of the blocked coronary artery may afford some protection of pump function and improve the prognosis in acute myocardial infarction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)345-351
Number of pages7
JournalThe American journal of cardiology
Volume37
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 4 1976

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Cardiogenic Shock
Coronary Vessels
Myocardial Infarction
Survival
Infarction
Ventricular Function
Angina Pectoris
Cardiac Catheterization
Shock
Angiography
Emergencies
Stroke
Blood Pressure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Functional significance of coronary collateral vessels in patients with acute myocardial infarction : Relation to pump performance, cardiogenic shock and survival. / Williams, David O.; Amsterdam, Ezra A; Miller, Richard R.; Mason, Dean T.

In: The American journal of cardiology, Vol. 37, No. 3, 04.03.1976, p. 345-351.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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