Functional MRI at 1.5 tesla: A comparison of the blood oxygenation level-dependent signal and electrophysiology

Elizabeth A. Disbrow, Daniel A. Slutsky, Timothy P L Roberts, Leah A. Krubitzer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

147 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

How well does the functional MRI (fMRI) signal reflect underlying electrophysiology? Despite the ubiquity of the technique, this question has yet to be adequately answered. Therefore, we have compared cortical maps generated based on the indirect blood oxygenation level-dependent signal of fMRI with maps from microelectrode recording techniques, which directly measure neural activity. Identical somatosensory stimuli were used in both sets of experiments in the same anesthetized macaque monkeys. Our results demonstrate that fMRI can be used to determine the topographic organization of cortical fields with 55% concordance to electrophysiological maps. The variance in the location of fMRI activation was greatest in the plane perpendicular to local vessels. An appreciation of the limitations of fMRI improves our ability to use it effectively to study cortical organization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)9718-9723
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume97
Issue number17
StatePublished - Aug 15 2000

Fingerprint

Electrophysiology
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Macaca
Microelectrodes
Haplorhini

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • General

Cite this

Functional MRI at 1.5 tesla : A comparison of the blood oxygenation level-dependent signal and electrophysiology. / Disbrow, Elizabeth A.; Slutsky, Daniel A.; Roberts, Timothy P L; Krubitzer, Leah A.

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 97, No. 17, 15.08.2000, p. 9718-9723.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Disbrow, Elizabeth A. ; Slutsky, Daniel A. ; Roberts, Timothy P L ; Krubitzer, Leah A. / Functional MRI at 1.5 tesla : A comparison of the blood oxygenation level-dependent signal and electrophysiology. In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 2000 ; Vol. 97, No. 17. pp. 9718-9723.
@article{af2327e49883432aaaebfe7c4dd27948,
title = "Functional MRI at 1.5 tesla: A comparison of the blood oxygenation level-dependent signal and electrophysiology",
abstract = "How well does the functional MRI (fMRI) signal reflect underlying electrophysiology? Despite the ubiquity of the technique, this question has yet to be adequately answered. Therefore, we have compared cortical maps generated based on the indirect blood oxygenation level-dependent signal of fMRI with maps from microelectrode recording techniques, which directly measure neural activity. Identical somatosensory stimuli were used in both sets of experiments in the same anesthetized macaque monkeys. Our results demonstrate that fMRI can be used to determine the topographic organization of cortical fields with 55{\%} concordance to electrophysiological maps. The variance in the location of fMRI activation was greatest in the plane perpendicular to local vessels. An appreciation of the limitations of fMRI improves our ability to use it effectively to study cortical organization.",
author = "Disbrow, {Elizabeth A.} and Slutsky, {Daniel A.} and Roberts, {Timothy P L} and Krubitzer, {Leah A.}",
year = "2000",
month = "8",
day = "15",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "97",
pages = "9718--9723",
journal = "Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America",
issn = "0027-8424",
number = "17",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Functional MRI at 1.5 tesla

T2 - A comparison of the blood oxygenation level-dependent signal and electrophysiology

AU - Disbrow, Elizabeth A.

AU - Slutsky, Daniel A.

AU - Roberts, Timothy P L

AU - Krubitzer, Leah A.

PY - 2000/8/15

Y1 - 2000/8/15

N2 - How well does the functional MRI (fMRI) signal reflect underlying electrophysiology? Despite the ubiquity of the technique, this question has yet to be adequately answered. Therefore, we have compared cortical maps generated based on the indirect blood oxygenation level-dependent signal of fMRI with maps from microelectrode recording techniques, which directly measure neural activity. Identical somatosensory stimuli were used in both sets of experiments in the same anesthetized macaque monkeys. Our results demonstrate that fMRI can be used to determine the topographic organization of cortical fields with 55% concordance to electrophysiological maps. The variance in the location of fMRI activation was greatest in the plane perpendicular to local vessels. An appreciation of the limitations of fMRI improves our ability to use it effectively to study cortical organization.

AB - How well does the functional MRI (fMRI) signal reflect underlying electrophysiology? Despite the ubiquity of the technique, this question has yet to be adequately answered. Therefore, we have compared cortical maps generated based on the indirect blood oxygenation level-dependent signal of fMRI with maps from microelectrode recording techniques, which directly measure neural activity. Identical somatosensory stimuli were used in both sets of experiments in the same anesthetized macaque monkeys. Our results demonstrate that fMRI can be used to determine the topographic organization of cortical fields with 55% concordance to electrophysiological maps. The variance in the location of fMRI activation was greatest in the plane perpendicular to local vessels. An appreciation of the limitations of fMRI improves our ability to use it effectively to study cortical organization.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0034662965&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0034662965&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 10931954

AN - SCOPUS:0034662965

VL - 97

SP - 9718

EP - 9723

JO - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

JF - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

SN - 0027-8424

IS - 17

ER -