Functional localization of sustained attention: Comparison to sensory stimulation in the absence of instruction

R. M. Cohen, W. E. Semple, M. Gross, H. H. Holcomb, M. S. Dowling, Thomas E Nordahl

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

188 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Regional brain metabolism was determined by positron emission tomography for normal subjects while they performed auditory discrimination, received somatosensory stimulation, or rested. Higher metabolic rates were found in regions of the right middle prefrontal cortex and lower metabolic rates were found in the anterior cingulate and superior posterior parietal cortices of subjects performing auditory discrimination. Furthermore, a direct relationship was observed between metabolic rates in the middle prefrontal cortex and the accuracy of a subject's auditory discrimination, suggesting that this brain region is an important determinant of sustained attention. The somatosensory condition, i.e., receiving 35 min of 'meaningless' intermittent electric shock, a condition that has been previously used to study frontal cortex activation in psychiatric disorders, was not associated with generalized activation of the frontal cortex. The higher metabolic rates in the inferior prefrontal cortex and in regions of the temporal cortex observed with shock may relate to habituation, extinction, or inhibition of response.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3-20
Number of pages18
JournalNeuropsychiatry, Neuropsychology and Behavioral Neurology
Volume1
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1988
Externally publishedYes

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Prefrontal Cortex
Frontal Lobe
Shock
Parietal Lobe
Gyrus Cinguli
Brain
Temporal Lobe
Positron-Emission Tomography
Psychiatry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Neurology
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Functional localization of sustained attention : Comparison to sensory stimulation in the absence of instruction. / Cohen, R. M.; Semple, W. E.; Gross, M.; Holcomb, H. H.; Dowling, M. S.; Nordahl, Thomas E.

In: Neuropsychiatry, Neuropsychology and Behavioral Neurology, Vol. 1, No. 1, 1988, p. 3-20.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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